US Courts
US Courts

Workplace Changes Recommended for Judiciary

The Federal Judiciary Workplace Conduct Working Group, a group of federal judges and senior Judiciary officials formed at the request of Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., issued a report recommending measures to improve workplace conduct policies and procedures in the federal Judiciary. The Working Group submitted its findings to the …

US Courts
US Courts

Celebrating 50 Years of Magistrate Judges

Magistrate judges play an important role in the judicial process, helping district judges in criminal and civil matters by handling complaints, issuing search warrants, holding preliminary hearings, and much more.

US Courts
US Courts

U.S. Courts Celebrate Law Day

Federal courts around the country sponsored a variety of events to commemorate Law Day during the month of May, a tradition celebrating the rule of law in the United States that dates to the Eisenhower administration.  

US Courts
US Courts

Court Celebrates New Citizens, in Living Color

An effort to spruce up a courthouse display case with photos from a naturalization ceremony quickly became something more–an opportunity for the District of Maine to share the joy of 39 new citizens with their friends and families around the globe. 

Courts Extend Thanks to Jurors
US Courts

Courts Extend Thanks to Jurors

This week is Juror Appreciation Week, and federal courts across the country are honoring citizens for their participation and raising awareness about the importance of jury service.

Students Learn Civil Discourse Skills in Federal Courts
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Students Learn Civil Discourse Skills in Federal Courts

In an effort to bolster civil discourse and good decision-making in the next generation of jurors and engaged citizens, federal judges are hosting high school and college students in their courtrooms to observe, learn, and practice critical life skills.

Bankruptcy Filings Continue to Decline
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Bankruptcy Filings Continue to Decline

Bankruptcy filings fell by 1.8 percent for the 12-month period ending March 31, 2018, compared with the year ending March 31, 2017. 

Judiciary Seeks 2019 Funding, Highlights Cost-Saving Successes
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Judiciary Seeks 2019 Funding, Highlights Cost-Saving Successes

Representatives of the federal Judiciary today asked Congress to provide $7.22 billion in fiscal year 2019 to fund continuing operations of the judicial branch. The request includes funding to sustain cybersecurity initiatives and ensure sufficient security at federal courthouses.

From Courtroom to Classroom: Judges Invest Themselves in Financial Literacy
US Courts

From Courtroom to Classroom: Judges Invest Themselves in Financial Literacy

April is Financial Literacy Month, and bankruptcy courts across the country are doing what they can to foster greater awareness of the benefits of informed personal-finance planning and decision-making.

Court Recalls MLK’s Last Legal Battle
US Courts

Court Recalls MLK’s Last Legal Battle

The U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee revisits Martin Luther King, Jr.,’s last legal battle.

Jurors, Defense Lawyers Receive Rate Increases; Funding Approved for 3 Courthouses
US Courts

Jurors, Defense Lawyers Receive Rate Increases; Funding Approved for 3 Courthouses

The daily fee paid to federal jurors will increase for the first time since 1990, private attorneys appointed to represent indigents will receive an hourly rate increase, and the General Services Administration will get $437 million to build three urgently needed courthouse projects, as a result of funding included in …

AO Publishes Annual Report and Court Statistics
US Courts

AO Publishes Annual Report and Court Statistics

The Judiciary confronted many challenges in 2017 that reinforced the importance and value of court employees working together through “a coordinated and unified approach.” That was the message from James C. Duff, the director of the Administrative Office on the U.S. Courts, in his annual report on the activities and …

Judicial Conference Receives Status Report on Workplace Conduct Review
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Judicial Conference Receives Status Report on Workplace Conduct Review

Nearly 20 reforms and improvements have been implemented or are under development to help address workplace conduct concerns in the federal judiciary, James C. Duff, Chair of the Federal Judiciary Workplace Conduct Working Group, reported today at the biannual meeting of the Judicial Conference.

Judge Carolyn Dimmick: Women’s Advances in Law Careers Are ‘So Heartening’
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Judge Carolyn Dimmick: Women’s Advances in Law Careers Are ‘So Heartening’

Senior Judge Carolyn Dimmick of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington earned her law degree in 1953 when female lawyers were rare and, so too, were opportunities for them. In honor of Women’s History Month, a new video profile explores the highlights and challenges of Judge …

Just the Facts: Consumer Bankruptcy Filings, 2006-2017
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Just the Facts: Consumer Bankruptcy Filings, 2006-2017

Just the Facts is a feature that highlights issues and trends in the Judiciary based on data collected by the Judiciary Data and Analysis Office (JDAO) of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. 

Litigation Academy Turns Court Into a Classroom for Lawyers
US Courts

Litigation Academy Turns Court Into a Classroom for Lawyers

The Litigation Academy, created by the district court in Rhode Island in partnership with a local law school and bar association, is turning a federal courtroom into a classroom for local lawyers to develop courtroom skills.

Judiciary Workplace Conduct Group Seeks Law Clerk, Employee Input
US Courts

Judiciary Workplace Conduct Group Seeks Law Clerk, Employee Input

A new mailbox on uscourts.gov is available for current and former federal Judiciary law clerks and all other employees to submit comments relating to the federal Judiciary’s policies and procedures for protecting all employees from inappropriate workplace conduct.

More Courts Use Essay Contests to Teach Lessons in Justice
US Courts

More Courts Use Essay Contests to Teach Lessons in Justice

Growing numbers of federal courts, aided by legal associations, are using essay contests to inform and inspire young people about how the Constitution and courts protect personal liberties. 

Civil Rights Champion Uses Law to Fight Racism
US Courts

Civil Rights Champion Uses Law to Fight Racism

Main content Long before President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed him to the federal bench, Judge Damon J. Keith was a fervent champion of equal justice under the law. While attending Howard Law School, Keith befriended future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. Keith then joined a Detroit law firm that specialized …