CIA

  • DCIA Haspel Visits Auburn University
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-04-19
    22 hours ago
  • CIA Director Gina Haspel Speaks at Auburn University
    18 April 2019 Good morning. It’s a pleasure to be here with you this morning. I’d like to begin by thanking General Burgess for the warm welcome. I also want to thank all of you for being here today. It’s encouraging to see so many young people taking an interest in our nation’s security and in the role CIA plays in protecting our country. I also wanted to congratulate Auburn for winning the SEC tournament and making it to the Final Four for the first time! As a Kentuckian and die-hard Wildcats fan, the Auburn-Kentucky game was a little painful to watch—but, I have to admit, it was a well-deserved victory for the Tigers. Once my team was out, I threw my support to your guys. And speaking of historic sports rivalries, I thought I’d share a little story with you from early in my career. I was overseas on my first assignment in Africa when I met a Baptist missionary couple—let’s call them Jerry and Rosy. Jerry was a proud Auburn alum, and since my boss, Mark, happened to be one as well, I’d overhear stories about Jerry and his love for Auburn sports. One day, I learned that Rosy, Jerry’s wife, had had quite a scare the night before. Rosy found Jerry in bed clutching his chest and gasping for air, and she thought he might be having a heart attack—a terrifying prospect when you’re hundreds of miles away from the nearest hospital. Rosy ran over to Jerry ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-04-18
    2 days ago
  • Women in Intel: Maria Gulovich
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-04-16
    4 days ago
  • Ask Molly: April 11, 2019
    Dear Molly, Does CIA really have a library? If so, I would like a library card! ~ Bookworm Dear Bookworm, We do have a library! But to get a library card, you’ll need a security clearance. That’s because although CIA Library might look like any other modern public library, resting alongside the periodicals and stacks of books on history, international affairs, and science you’ll find volumes most Americans will never see. The literature of secrets. But our collection is mainly unclassified, and we have approximately 100,000 print materials and access to over 200 online databases that include more than 90,000 full-text electronic periodicals, dissertations, photographs, and public records. Whew, that’s a lot of information! We also have materials like maps, language resources, and movies. (Yep, we even have a DVD collection that includes spy movies and documentaries). We also have a few more “interesting” collections you won’t find at your neighborhood library. The Whaley Denial and Deception Collection contains materials on magic, lying, and even methods used by catchers and pitchers to communicate during baseball games. The Historical Intelligence Collection is basically a treasure trove of anything to do with the intelligence profession. We have more than 25,000 books and press clippings in the collection. The oldest item is a book on cryptography bound in vellum and published primarily in Latin in 1606! With all that information, it should come as no surprise then that we also have full-time librarians who work at CIA. They’re in high demand, and ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-04-11
    1 week ago
  • Women in Intel: Elizabeth Sudmeier
    From Typist to Ops Officer “She was a real pistol… The fact that she accomplished so much is incredible given the general antagonism to women functioning as ops officers. This was a general view among male ops officers… Liz certainly paved the way for female ops officers.”  ~ Friend and colleague of Elizabeth Sudmeier Elizabeth Sudmeier was a pioneer in breaking down gender barriers at CIA. As a founding member of the Agency, Elizabeth, like many women at that time, began her career as a typist. Yet, despite the resistance of Agency senior managers and supervisors, Elizabeth did what few women were able to do. Elizabeth worked as a field operations officer, serving overseas in places like the Middle East and South Asia for almost nine years, and helped usher in a new era of woman’s equality at the Agency. Because of her historic contributions, Elizabeth was selected as one of the 2013 CIA Trailblazers, those “whose leadership, achievements, and dedication to mission had a significant and lasting impact on the Agency's history.” Read More ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-04-03
    2 weeks ago
  • The Art of Simple Sabotage
    The rascally spies of OSS knew a thing or two about mischief making, especially when it came to undermining America’s enemies in World War II. One of their more imaginative ideas was to train everyday citizens in the art of simple sabotage. Thus, the “Simple Sabotage Field Manual” was born: [PDF 2.5 MB]. This previously classified booklet describes ways to train normal people to be purposely annoying telephone operators, dysfunctional train conductors, befuddling middle managers, blundering factory workers, unruly movie theater patrons, and so on.   In other words, teaching people to do their jobs badly. OSS Director William “Wild Bill” Donovan had select parts of the manual declassified and disseminated to citizens of enemy states through pamphlets, targeted radio broadcasts, and in person. While the guidebook does contain ideas for serious, hardcore sabotage you’d expect during wartime, there are many timeless (and dare we say all-too-familiar) tactics that could drive even the most sane person batty. Here’s a list of five particularly timeless tips from the “Simple Sabotage Field Manual”: Telephone: At the office, hotel, or local telephone switchboards, delay putting calls through, give out wrong numbers, cut people off “accidentally,” or forget to disconnect them so that the line cannot be used again. Movie Theater Patrons: To ruin everyone’s time at the movies (without a cell phone, that is) bring in a paper bag filled with two or three dozen large moths. Open the bag and set it in an empty section of the theater. “The moths will ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-04-01
    3 weeks ago
  • Women in Intel: Betty Ann Lussier
    The Intrepid Woman “After months of interviewing, conniving, scheming, here I was on the threshold of departure for the war. Was I frightened? After my hazardous childhood on the farm, dealing with runaway mule teams, overturned wagons, raging bulls, and machinery that collapsed on top of my body, no, I was not frightened, but yes, I was curious, elated, and open to a new adventure.” ~ Betty Ann Lussier from her autobiography, “Intrepid Woman: Betty Ann Lussier’s Secret War, 1942-1945” Betty Ann Lussier was a fiercely independent, hard working, adventurous woman with a craving for excitement and a compassion for humanitarian issues. She grew up on a dairy farm and learned to fly a plane at the young age of 16. When she was 20, she boarded a ship to England to fight the Nazis. She became a successful counterintelligence agent with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) and married one of the wealthiest men in Spain. She socialized with Ernest Hemingway and Ava Gardner and later worked for the United Nations. She also authored several books. Betty personified the ideal OSS agent. She was strong-willed, intelligent, self-motivated, brave, dedicated, and driven. Read More ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-26
    4 weeks ago
  • The Intrepid Woman: Betty Ann Lussier
    Betty Ann Lussier was a fiercely independent, hardworking, adventurous woman with a craving for excitement and a compassion for humanitarian issues. She grew up on a dairy farm and learned to fly a plane at the young age of 16. When she was 20, she boarded a ship to England to fight the Nazis. She became a successful counterintelligence agent with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) and married one of the wealthiest men in Spain. She socialized with Ernest Hemingway and Ava Gardner and later worked for the United Nations. She also authored several books. Betty personified the ideal OSS agent. She was strong-willed, intelligent, self-motivated, brave, dedicated, and driven. Betty Ann was born in December, 1921 in Alberta, Canada. Her father, Emile John Lussier, was a decorated World War I fighter pilot with the Royal Air Force who earned the British Distinguished Flying Cross as a teenager. Betty’s mom, Vera Fleming, was a homemaker and farmer. When Betty was four their family purchased Huntingfield Farm, a dairy farm on the Chesapeake Bay on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. The farm initially had no electricity, telephone or indoor plumbing. Betty assisted with the chores which began at 4:30 a.m. by hand-milking the cows. The land once used by Indians for tribal gatherings now hosted a girl’s camp during the summer months at which Betty and her sister’s worked as counselors. Betty inherited her father’s love of flying and learned to pilot a small three-seater Piper Cub plane. She enrolled at ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-26
    4 weeks ago
  • Michael Collins at CSIS
    CIA Headlines Schieffer Panel on “China’s Rise” at CSIS On Wednesday, March 20th, Deputy Assistant Director of CIA for the East Asia and Pacific Mission Center, Michael Collins, participated in a panel discussion on the rise of China, moderated by former CBS’ Face the Nation anchor Bob Schieffer at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, DC. Embedded video Collins, and fellow panelists, held a robust conversation on a broad range of issues impacting US-China relations and the international community, including how China’s domestic governance model has changed under President Xi Jinping’s leadership and how China leverages its economic growth and military strength to influence the international order. Collins was very clear about what the challenge is not. “The challenge is not necessarily coming from China’s rise alone, China’s economy alone, our relationship with China, Chinese people, and certainly [not] the Chinese diaspora around the world. To the contrary, those are all very positive forces for moderation, cooperation, and change, “he said. Collins was joined on stage by Margaret Brennan, Moderator of “Face the Nation” and CBS News senior foreign correspondent; Victor Cha, CSIS Senior Adviser and Korea Chair; and Christopher K. Johnson, CSIS Senior Adviser and Freeman Chair in China Studies. ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-25
    4 weeks ago
  • Ask Molly: March 22, 2019
    Dear Molly, How many CIA women have died in the line of duty? ~ Fallen Stars Dear Fallen Stars, We have an ivory-white marble wall in our lobby at CIA Headquarters that stands as a silent, simple memorial to honor the women and men who have given their lives in service to our country. Currently, there are 129 stars carved into the marble of the CIA Memorial Wall: 91 are unclassified. Of those, 11 represent women. Officially, the first female CIA officer to die in the line of duty and receive a star on the Memorial Wall was Barbara Robbins. She was killed only two years after joining the Agency – in March 1965 – when terrorists bombed the US Embassy in South Vietnam. She remains the youngest CIA officer to receive a star, at just 21-years old. However, what many Agency history buffs don’t know is that the first ever CIA officer to die while working for the Agency was also a woman: her name was Jane Wallis Burrell. At a time when most women in US intelligence worked in clerical roles, Jane was a CIA counterintelligence officer who served in all of CIA’s predecessor agencies: the Office of Strategic Services, the Strategic Services Unit, and the Central Intelligence Group. On January 6, 1948, an Air France flight from Brussels crashed on its way to Paris, killing all five crew members and 10 of the 11 passengers. Among the dead was a young woman who the press said ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-22
    4 weeks ago
  • Women in Intel: Virginia Hall
    The Courage and Daring of "The Limping Lady" “Miss Hall displayed rare courage, perseverance and ingenuity; her efforts contributed materially to the successful operations of the Resistance Forces in support of the Allied Expeditionary Forces in the liberation of France.” ~ President Harry Truman, Citation for Distinguished Service Cross awarded to Virginia Hall, 1945. Her life reads like a spy novel. From overcoming the loss of her leg to working clandestinely behind enemy lines for the OSS, she’s a true American hero. Who is this brave woman? Some knew her as "Marie Monin," "Germaine," "Diane," "Camille," and even "Nicolas," but we know her as Virginia Hall. During WWII, Virginia organized agent networks, assisted escaped prisoners of war, and recruited French men and women to run safe houses—staying one step ahead of the Gestapo, who wanted desperately to apprehend “The Limping Lady.” For her courage and ingenuity, she was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross—the only civilian woman to be so honored. Virginia then went on to become one of only a handful of senior women in CIA’s clandestine service until her mandatory retirement in 1966 at the age of 60. And she did it all despite having a prosthetic leg, which she named Cuthbert. Read More ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-21
    4 weeks ago
  • Women in Intel: “Spy Girl” Betty McIntosh
    McIntosh's Morale Operations “They taught us how to utilize material tailored for specific targets in the Far East. We had to learn to disseminate the material, a mix of truth and fantasy; we were taught how to get rumors started.” ~ Betty McIntosh on her time in OSS’s Morale Operations branch. Elizabeth “Betty” McIntosh lived a storied, adventurous life. During WWII, she was one of the few women hired into the OSS Morale Operations (MO) branch, charged with creating rumors that our foreign adversaries would believe. In other words, so-called “black propaganda.” Betty helped create false news reports, postcards, documents, and radio messages designed to spread disinformation to undermine Japanese troop morale. In one truly inexplicable incident, she created a script for a popular Chinese fortune teller to read on a radio station secretly run by the Allies that predicted “something awful” was about to happen in Japan. Her team had no inkling something bad was actually going to happen, but later that day, the US dropped the atom bomb on Hiroshima. When OSS was disbanded, Betty tried on a few different careers but eventually was convinced to return to a life in intelligence at CIA. She worked for the Agency until her retirement in 1973. As the author of several books, including “Sisterhood of Spies,” Betty made sure that the stories of the women of OSS and their daring adventures would never be forgotten. Perhaps it’s fitting, then, that Women’s History Month begins each year on March 1st, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-19
    1 month ago
  • CIA Announces New Deputy Chief Operating Officer
    18 March 2019 The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) today announced the appointment of John G. Edwards as Deputy Chief Operating Officer (D/COO).  John has held a number of enterprise-level leadership positions in his Agency career, serving most recently as Chief Information Officer (CIO) and the Director of CIA’s Information Technology Enterprise.  John is known within CIA and the private sector for his leadership, corporate vision, and bias for action.  His experience at CIA includes 14 years as a Communications and Technical Operations Officer within the Directorate of Science and Technology (DS&T) and five years serving as the Chief of Staff to the CIA’s Executive Director, the position known today as Chief Operating Officer.  He also served as the Agency’s Executive Secretary, leading the Operations Center, Analytic Support Team, Action Center, and Critical Mission Assurance Program. John departed CIA in 2003 for the private sector where he played integral roles in two successful startup companies. In 2015, Agency leadership asked him to bring his talent back to Langley as CIO.  John’s first public appearance as D/COO will be Sunday, March 24, 2019, when he delivers remarks at the Cipher Brief Threat Conference in Sea Island, Georgia. # # # ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-18
    1 month ago
  • Ask Molly: March 18, 2019
    Q: Dear Molly, What’s the upper age limit for employment at the CIA? Thanks! ~ Ageless A: Dear Ageless, We recently presented at South by Southwest (SXSW) in Austin, Texas and this was the most frequently asked question. Some federal agencies do have an upper age limit for employment for certain positions; however, CIA does not. There's no strict age limit for employment; hiring decisions are made based on a review of the whole person. You can join the CIA right out of high school, since 18 is the minimum age for employment here, but most of our positions require at least a bachelor’s degree. We have several year-round opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students. Our primary requirements for employment are that you must be a US citizen and a high school graduate. As stated earlier, most occupations require an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university. Military experience is highly valued, as are advanced degrees, and life experiences are always taken into consideration. Integrity, character, and patriotism are a must. Fluency in a foreign language is a plus. Our personnel requirements change from month-to-month as positions are filled and others become available, so if you don’t see the right job for you now, check back again soon. Good luck! ~ Molly ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-18
    1 month ago
  • Women in Intel: Marion Frieswyk
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-15
    1 month ago
  • CIA’s Secrets to Creative Problem Solving at the SXSW Conference and Festivals
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-13
    1 month ago
  • Women in Intel: Captain Czech
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-12
    1 month ago
  • Ask Molly: March 7, 2019
    Q: Dear Ms. Hale, As a little girl, I dreamed of being in the CIA but never thought it was actually possible. What advice do you have for youth who would like to learn more about serving their country? Thank you! ~ Seeking to Serve A: Dear Seeking to Serve, It always makes me smile when I get letters from young people throughout the United States who have a passion for public service. There are tons of different ways you can serve your country – like the military, community service, law enforcement, paramedics, education, infrastructure, and social services, among others – and of course, coming to work for us! I know it sounds generic, but to work at the CIA, there’s no “right” college major, background, or even skillset. We’re a very diverse workplace, both in terms of the types of jobs we staff as well as the people we hire. The best advice I can give is to do well in what you’re interested in: whether that be science, computers, history, law, medicine, art, literature, mechanics, or something else, and get good grades in school. Most careers here require at least a college degree. Other than that, learn as much as you can about the Agency and the different types of jobs we have. Go to career fairs, talk with Agency recruiters and former officers if you get the opportunity, ask a lot of questions, and do a lot of research. A good place to start learning about ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-03-07
    1 month ago
  • Ask Molly: February 28, 2019
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-02-28
    2 months ago
  • Ask Molly: February 22, 2019
    @[email protected] #AskMollyHale What’s your favorite thing about working for the CIA? Dear @MaceTheSpaceDog, Driving an Aston Martin, of course. Just kidding! The best thing about working for the CIA is being part of an important mission bigger than yourself, working alongside dedicated and humble Americans who are passionate about protecting our country. You’re part of a team, a family, even if your role is a less traditional one, like “Molly Hale.” The people who work at the Agency come from a range of backgrounds, and we have almost every job imaginable here. In addition to the jobs you may think of when CIA comes to mind, such as analysts and operations officers, we also have accountants, mediators, doctors, photographers, and even hairdressers. (Yes, even hairdressers! We have disguise artists who must create elaborate and believable disguises for our operations officers overseas, so we employ people who are seamstresses, hairdressers, and makeup artists. Pretty cool, huh?) That’s one thing about working at CIA that many people don’t realize: Once you become a CIA officer, the opportunities are endless. ~ Molly ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-02-22
    2 months ago
  • Ask Molly: February 14, 2019
    Dear Molly,I met someone on an online dating site who says he’s a CIA officer, but I don’t know if he’s telling me the truth. The more we talked the more things didn’t match up. He said that because he works for the CIA, I had to do a background check or else he couldn’t keep talking to me. How do I know this person is really in the CIA, and if this email is legitimate? Is it safe to submit my personal information?~ Plenty of Phish Dear Plenty of Phish (and all you lonely hearts out there),It’s almost Valentine’s Day. If you, like many Americans, are looking for love online, be careful. Please DO NOT give your personal information to anyone on a dating site claiming to be a CIA officer. Best case, they have an overblown ego and bad judgment; worst case, it’s a scam designed to steal your financial information. Don’t take the bait. Unfortunately, our security officers have been hearing more frequently about this particular con. It’s a type of “phishing” scam. (For those that don’t know, “phishing” is the criminally fraudulent process of attempting to acquire sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, account numbers, credit card details, and other personally identifying information via electronic communication). These con artists go onto dating sites and chat up potential victims, pretending to look for love or a date. He (or she) weaves a sorry tale about being a super-secret CIA officer working on a dangerous mission overseas, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-02-14
    2 months ago
  • Ask Molly: February 7, 2019
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-02-07
    2 months ago
  • Have a Question About the CIA? Ask Molly!
    Meet Molly Hale. She’s been the CIA’s public voice since 2002, responding to faxes, phone calls, emails, and snail mail sent to the Agency. Now she’s going digital. Molly is venturing for the first time into the social media sphere. She’s going to be periodically answering your questions in a new series called: Ask Molly. Check the CIA.gov blog regularly for Q&A columns by Molly, as well as our official social media accounts. “Molly Hale,” as you may have guessed, is a pseudonym. Over the years, there have been several different “Mollys,” including a few men! All are real people, who work at the Agency. Some were Molly for only a short time, while others served as Molly for years. It’s a unique role and one that we are excited to introduce to the social media world. How to Submit a Question: The easiest way to submit a question for Molly is on our official @CIA Twitter and Facebook pages using the hashtag #AskMollyHale. You can also send an email to us via our comment form on CIA.gov (upper right hand corner). Just be sure to use our hashtag if you want your question featured. A Few Ground Rules: As anyone who follows us on Twitter or Facebook knows, we get tons of comments and questions that span the gamut from recruitment to conspiracy theories to history to policy. There’s a lot that Molly will be able to answer and she can’t wait to see your questions. Unfortunately, there ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-02-04
    3 months ago
  • Sixth Installment Available of “The Daily Summary: Informing President Truman”
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-01-24
    3 months ago
  • Honoring the Legendary Tony Mendez
    Argo - Rescue of the Canadian Six by Deborah Dismuke One of our most legendary Agency officers, Antonio J. “Tony” Mendez, passed away over the weekend after a brave battle with Parkinson’s disease. Perhaps best known for masterminding the daring 1980 rescue of six American diplomats from Iran, an operation made famous by the film Argo, Tony will be remembered for his patriotism, ingenuity, and lifelong commitment to our Agency’s mission. A native of Eureka, Nevada, Tony started working for the Agency in 1965 and spent 25 years as a document counterfeiter and disguise maker in what was then called the Office of Technical Services. During the height of the Cold War, Tony painstakingly devised a number of critical deception operations in places like Southeast Asia and the former Soviet Union. In 1979, Tony and other CIA technical specialists created a dummy movie-production company in Hollywood and delivered disguises and documents that made possible the escape of six American diplomats from capture in Iran in 1980. The CIA closely held the story until revealing it to the public for the Agency’s 50th anniversary celebration in 1997. The 2012 award-winning film Argo, produced by and starring Ben Affleck, dramatized this story of deception and intrigue for the world to see. Tony was awarded an Intelligence Star for his work on the Argo operation and later received a Trailblazer Award for his profound contributions to CIA’s mission throughout his career. He retired in 1990 as a Senior Intelligence Service officer. ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2019-01-23
    3 months ago
  • A Day in the Life of a CIA Cyber Operations Officer
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-12-21
    4 months ago
  • 50 Years of “Operation Santa Claus”
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-12-21
    4 months ago
  • Sending Holiday Wishes Near and Far
    The holidays are upon us, and this time of year we reflect upon the sacrifices of Agency officers past and present, those who have made the ultimate sacrifice, and those who are serving in some of the most dangerous and inhospitable parts of the world away from loved ones. In an effort championed by CIA leadership and Deputy Director Vaughn Bishop’s wife, Mrs. Marian Bishop, the CIA family has come together to show officers overseas just how much their service and sacrifice are appreciated. Throughout the month of December, CIA officers and their families have been writing heartfelt holiday messages for colleagues in far-flung parts of the world. Mrs. Bishop kicked-off the letter-writing campaign by sharing her experience as an Agency spouse. “If you have ever served overseas on a hardship tour, you know how rewarding the experience can be. But the demands of the job can take a heavy toll on our officers and on their family members as well.” Mrs. Bishop also visited with local children and helped them to craft their own holiday wishes. “You’ll help lift the spirits of some truly dedicated patriots who are sacrificing on our behalf.” The children were excited to make pictures of trees, rainbows, houses, cars, and spaceships. A young girl commented, “I want to draw to make them feel better when they get it.” In the coming days, we will share some of these very special messages on CIA’s official Twitter and Facebook pages. Stay tuned… ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-12-17
    4 months ago
  • CIA “Spider-Man”
    CIA officers often find themselves in situations which are not exactly part of their job description, but they rise to the occasion and, sometimes, they even save a life. Such was the case for one of our technicians, who must remain nameless, that worked for the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) in the 1980s. FBIS, now known as the Open Source Enterprise, is responsible for gathering open-source (i.e. publicly available) information for the US government. * * * * * It was winter in Jordan, 1982, when an FBIS technician was settling in for the night, relaxing in front of the TV. Out of the corner of his eye, he noticed a flicker of light coming from outside. Curious, he went to the window and peered out. He saw flames leaping 30 feet into the air from the 3-story apartment building next door. After calling the local fire department, he ran outside to see if he could help. A young child was trapped on the roof, screaming in terror. The flames hadn’t yet reached the 6-year-old boy, but the technician knew that diesel fuel tanks were located on the roof and could explode at any moment. The technician—barefoot—scaled the outside of the rough sandstone building, clutching the soil drainage pipes that snaked their way up the structure, and made his way to roof where the young boy stood. He swung the terrified child up onto his back and scrambled back down the side of the building. Safely on the ground, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-12-14
    4 months ago
  • Fifth Installment Available of “The Daily Summary: Informing President Truman”
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-12-13
    4 months ago
  • School Without Walls
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-12-06
    4 months ago
  • George H.W. Bush—the 11th Director of Central Intelligence
    Thirteen years before becoming the President of the United States, George H.W. Bush served as the 11th Director of Central Intelligence (DCI). Many believed leading the CIA would mark an end to his political career. Instead, Bush became the only US president to have previously held the position of DCI, which gave him a unique perspective on both providing and receiving intelligence. Bush joined the Agency at a tumultuous time when morale was at an all-time low. He believed strongly in the mission of the Agency, and he believed in the CIA officers serving their nation. As DCI he immediately established himself as a leader who restored the morale and reputation of the CIA. Time of Troubles The 1970s came to be known as the “time of troubles” for the CIA. Six different DCIs served within a ten-year timeframe. The Agency was shrouded in controversy from the leak of the “Family Jewels,” an internal report detailing controversial activities undertaken by the Agency dating back to President Dwight Eisenhower’s administration. Congressional committees led by Representative Otis Pike and Senator Frank Church were formed in early 1975 to determine “the extent, if any, to which illegal, improper, or unethical activities were engaged in by any agency of the Federal Government.” The leak of the Family Jewels coupled with the investigations tainted the public image of the CIA and plummeted the morale of Agency officers. The Church Committee’s investigative work ultimately led to reform efforts throughout the intelligence community. However, a dark cloud ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-12-01
    5 months ago
  • Honoring the Legacy of George H.W. Bush—the 11th Director of Central Intelligence
    George HW Bush The men and women of the Central Intelligence Agency join the nation in mourning the loss of one of the most influential and beloved directors in the Agency’s history. Thirteen years before becoming the President of the United States, George H.W. Bush served as the 11th Director of Central Intelligence (DCI). Many believed leading the CIA would mark an end to his political career. Instead, Bush became the only US president to have previously held the position of DCI, which gave him a unique perspective on both providing and receiving intelligence. George H.W. Bush served as Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) from January 1976 to January 1977, just ten days shy of one full year. Though his tenure was limited, his accomplishments were not. Bush joined the Agency at a tumultuous time when morale was at an all-time low. He believed strongly in the mission of the Agency, and he believed in the CIA officers serving their nation. As DCI he immediately established himself as a leader who restored the morale and reputation of the CIA. Legacy at Langley George H.W. Bush is remembered as one of the CIA’s most impactful and significant directors. His tenure provided a meaningful and helpful “calm between the storms” for the Agency in the 1970s. As the first DCI who had served in Congress, Bush had the political influence to reshape the way the Agency was viewed among its most important stakeholders—the President of the United States and US ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-12-01
    5 months ago
  • CIA Remembers Former Director, Former President George H.W. Bush
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-12-01
    5 months ago
  • Fourth Installment Available of “The Daily Summary: Informing President Truman”
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest. To verify an employee's employment, ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-11-14
    5 months ago
  • Mi-17 JAWBREAKER Helicopter Arrives at CIA Headquarters
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs.Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest.To verify an employee's employment, please contact ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-09-26
    7 months ago
  • Remarks for Central Intelligence Agency Director Gina Haspel – McConnell Center at the University of Louisville
    24 September 2018 It’s a rare pleasure to be back home in Kentucky, and truly a privilege to be back on this campus. I want to thank Senator McConnell and President Bendapudi for the gracious invitation, and I want to thank all of you for being here today and for taking an interest in our nation’s security and in the role CIA plays in protecting our country. In the interest of full disclosure, and as Senator McConnell mentioned, I should tell you that my college years weren’t spent entirely in Louisville. Like Senator McConnell, I spent some of my time in college at a well-known university over in central Kentucky. But after finishing my junior year, the bright lights of this beautiful city beckoned, and I finished my degree as a Cardinal. Proudly so. Because I am a proud Kentuckian and a proud U of L graduate, it is very special for me to be with you all today. I look forward to speaking with Scott Jennings a little later. Before I do, I’d like to offer some brief remarks about the remarkable organization I am honored to lead: the Central Intelligence Agency. Over the summer, we hosted a special guest at Langley. Daniel Craig was kind enough to visit CIA Headquarters to talk about playing James Bond and how it compares to the real world of espionage. And yes—he parked his red Aston Martin right in front of our main lobby. Which raises a couple of big contrasts between ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-09-26
    7 months ago
  • Alyse Nelson visited CIA on Friday, September 21
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs.Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest.To verify an employee's employment, please contact ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-09-25
    7 months ago
  • Second Installment Now Available of “The Daily Summary: Informing President Truman”
    14 September 2018 The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) today released the second of six sets of declassified daily intelligence reports President Harry Truman received from CIA and its predecessor organization, the Central Intelligence Group, between 1946 and 1951. Known then as the Daily Summary, the product continues now as the President’s Daily Brief. Today’s release, available here, includes 245 Daily Summary reports from 11 March to 31 December 1946. The material initially focuses on U.S. efforts to stabilize Europe and East Asia after World War II and broadens to address leadership struggles worldwide and communist expansionism. The next mid-monthly installment of “The Daily Summary: Informing President Truman” will be available this October with a subsequent release each month through January 2019. The entire collection totals more than 3,000 pages and includes intelligence President Truman received regarding topics spanning the Berlin Airlift, the Chinese Revolution, and the Korean War. For a brief history of the Daily Summary, refer to this story.The first installment is available here. # # # Posted: Sep 14, 2018 09:36 AM Last Updated: Sep 14, 2018 03:21 PM ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-09-14
    7 months ago
  • CIA Honors Victims of 9/11 Attacks
    11 September 2018 At today’s remembrance event, Director Haspel placed a wreath next to an American flag recovered from Ground Zero. Photo credit: Central Intelligence Agency This morning, CIA officers gathered at Headquarters to mark the 17th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks by observing a moment of silence at 8:46 a.m. Eastern Time, the exact time when the first plane hit the World Trade Center. In a note to the workforce reflecting on the attacks, CIA Director Gina Haspel said, “Every year, the anniversary of 9/11 is a time for both remembrance and renewal. It’s a time to remember not only the lives we lost, but also the resilience of the American people, the strength of our values, and our determination to stand up to terrorism.” “As much as anyone, CIA epitomized our nation’s fighting spirit following 9/11, putting boots on the ground in Afghanistan only 15 days after the attacks.” Recently, the Agency moved a rust-colored steel column recovered in the rubble of the World Trade Center to its permanent memorial location. Learn more about the memorial here. # # # Posted: Sep 11, 2018 03:36 PM Last Updated: Sep 11, 2018 03:43 PM ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-09-11
    7 months ago
  • New 9/11 Memorial at CIA Headquarters
    A rust-colored steel column recovered amid the rubble of the World Trade Center after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks has a new home at CIA Headquarters. The 9000-pound, 17’6”-long steel column was retrieved from World Trade Center Building Six, the shortest tower at the World Trade Center complex at only eight stories tall. The steel beam was found between basement levels B-4 to B-6, and was likely near the Port Authority Trans-Hudson tube system. Building Six suffered secondary but catastrophic damage when the North Tower collapsed. In late 2011, the New York City Port Authority gave the World Trade Center artifact to CIA. The column was originally unveiled on the fifteenth anniversary of 9/11, when it was temporarily displayed inside our Original Headquarters Building, before being relocated this year to its permanent location outside. “Inside the Agency,” recalls CIA Museum Director Robert Byer, “it was encased in a wood box with an opening around it. Because it was in a contained space, when you walked past it, you noticed the scent of smoke. Fifteen years later, you could still smell the smoke from 9/11.” The steel column now resides in a solemn memorial on CIA grounds, a moving tribute to all those who died in the attacks on that fateful day, and serves as a space for Agency employees to honor the fallen. Rising seventeen feet into the air, the column is centered inside a circle of rounded river rocks, surrounded by muted grey, blue, and brown flagstone ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-09-11
    7 months ago
  • CIA Unveils Memorial to Agency K9s
    Down a winding path just beyond the Agency memorial pond—home to a cadre of colorful, fat, lazy koi—a new memorial dedicated to CIA’s K9 officers humbly sits upon a small hill, surrounded by grass, trees, and stones. Earlier this year, the Agency unveiled a new stone monument to honor the dogs who have spent their lives in service to their country. Carved from a roughhewn boulder, the monument features a paw print, the Agency seal, and an imprint of the Security Protective Service badge. A simple, poignant inscription reads: “Dedicated to the past, present, and future canines of the Central Intelligence Agency. Their loyalty, courage, and sacrifice will never be forgotten.” To learn more about CIA’s K9 officers, see our 2017 CIA K9 Series, where for 16 weeks we followed the journey of a new “puppy class” as they learned the ins-and-outs of becoming CIA Explosive Detection Dogs. ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-09-09
    7 months ago
  • A Day in the Life of a Publications Officer
    This is part of our series profiling CIA officers working in occupations not commonly associated with the Agency. We talk with them about their daily challenges and rewards, as well as some exceptional moments. We recently spoke with “Lynn,” a former schoolteacher who uses her keen eye for editing to help create the intelligence publications read by policymakers, including the President’s Daily Brief. Lynn, Publications Officer, three years with CIA Publications Officer is our fancy name for an editor. My job is to make sure that our intelligence products are reflective of CIA style and branding guidelines, properly classified and sourced, free of grammatical errors, and easily readable for non-experts. Our “customers”—policymakers, intelligence and military officers, diplomats, and their staffs and briefers—are incredibly busy people. It’s important that they quickly understand the bottom line and implications of the intelligence pieces they read every day. I also serve as the project manager for each intelligence product that I edit. I make sure that publishing deadlines are met, work with graphic designers and cartographers to edit and finalize visuals, and help disseminate the products to briefers and the wider Intelligence Community. I’m a mid-career hire. I spent several years teaching English in a public school before joining the Agency. I was lucky to know someone who worked in the Intelligence Community and pointed me toward this path because I didn’t even know that CIA had editors! As a former teacher, I’m able to use not only my knowledge of grammar for ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-09-05
    8 months ago
  • Director Haspel Announces Leadership Team
    The Office of Public Affairs (OPA) is the single point of contact for all inquiries about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate. However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Contact Information Submit questions or comments online By postal mail:Central Intelligence AgencyOffice of Public AffairsWashington, D.C. 20505 Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties Contact the Office of Inspector General Contact the Employment Verification Office Before contacting us: Please check our site map, search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site. Employment: We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs.Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept resumes, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US. When you return permanently to the US (not on vacation or leave), please visit the CIA Careers page and apply online for the position of interest.To verify an employee's employment, please contact ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-08-22
    8 months ago
  • DCIA Message to the Workforce: New Chief Operating Officer
    It is with great pleasure that Vaughn and I would like to announce that we have selected Andrew (Andy) Makridis to be CIA’s next Chief Operating Officer (COO). Many of you either know Andy or have worked with him during his 32-year CIA career. He has raised his hand countless times for the tough jobs and has always set the highest leadership standards. Andy has a reputation for creating empowered teams that drive the Agency mission forward. We think he is a great addition to our leadership team. Andy entered on duty in 1986, after spending two summers with CIA as a graduate fellow. He joined the Directorate of Intelligence in 1989, where he served in a number of expert-level analytic roles and management positions. Andy served as an executive assistant for DDCIA John McLaughlin before becoming President George W. Bush’s intelligence briefer, a position he held from December 2001 to February 2004. Director John Brennan asked Andy to stand up the Weapons and Counter Proliferation Mission Center and serve as its first Assistant Director (AD).  Andy has a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Buffalo and did his master’s work in computer science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Andy brings a wealth and breadth of experience from across the Agency. He’s worked both as an AD and at the Directorate level, and has a deep understanding of how the place works. Those of you who know him know how committed he is to the success of the CIA mission; you also ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-08-22
    8 months ago
  • DCIA Message to the Workforce: Sonya Holt Selected to Serve as CIA’s Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer
    Promoting a diverse and inclusive workforce is key to CIA’S ability to fulfill our global intelligence mission. While it is every Agency officer’s responsibility, the role of Talent Center’s Diversity and Inclusion Office plays a critical role on this front for CIA. I am pleased to announce Sonya L. Holt’s selection as the Agency’s Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer (CDIO). As a veteran officer who served more than three decades at CIA, Sonya brings a wealth of experience and expertise to DIO. She is widely known for putting people first in order to accomplish CIA’s mission and has a proven record track record as an inclusive leader and a champion for diversity. Prior to her selection as DIO, Sonya led the Director’s Advisory Group on Women in Leadership (DAG), which last month completed its five-year tenure. In her role overseeing the completion of the DAG effort, Sonya and her team successfully worked through the implementation plan stemming from the Study Group’s overall goal of increasing senior leadership opportunities for women at CIA and to improve opportunities for all employees. Throughout her 34 year Agency career, Sonya has served in a range of impactful leadership positions at Langley and in the field within the Directorates of Support and Science and Technology, and in the Director’s Area. Sonya many career highlights include her Joint Duty role as the Chief of Staff in the Pentagon’s Human Capital Management Office; Program Manager for the Director’s External Advisory Board, as well as well as a number of key ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-08-22
    8 months ago
  • Meet Our New Deputy Director
    Deputy Director Vaughn Bishop’s swearing-in, with his wife, and Judge Dabney Friedrich of the US District Court for DC. Vaughn Bishop never imagined that one day he would be asked to serve as Deputy Director of CIA. “Then again,” says Bishop, “at no point in my career did I ever cease to be amazed at the opportunities offered at CIA.” Bishop is also thrilled to work alongside his colleague and friend, Director Haspel, once more. Years ago, when Director Haspel was a senior operations officer, and Deputy Director Bishop was a senior analyst, they found themselves working together on difficult missions from opposite sides of the Agency directorate structure. “We made a point of stressing at every opportunity that one of our strengths comes from marshaling the diverse skills and expertise found in all our Directorates,” recalls Bishop. Both Director Haspel and Deputy Director Bishop believe that this kind of close collaboration and communication across directorates is critical to fulfilling the Agency’s mission. As Bishop likes to say: managing between the white spaces on the organization chart, the spaces between the Directorates, is a powerful force multiplier. As part of Director Haspel’s new leadership team, Vaughn Bishop is a force multiplier in his own right, bringing decades of experience, wisdom, and enthusiasm to the Agency. “I’ve always believed that CIA is a unique and special place,” says Bishop, “and I consider it the privilege of a lifetime to serve as a steward of this great institution.” A Lifelong Teacher ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-08-22
    8 months ago
  • CIA Hosts Tony Dungy & James “JB” Brown for CIA Speaker Series
    On Thursday, August 16th, CIA’s Office of Public Affairs hosted Tony Dungy, former head coach of the Indianapolis Colts and Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and James “JB” Brown, host of CBS Sports’ The NFL Today, for a CIA Speaker Series event at our Headquarters in Langley, VA. During their visit to the Agency, Coach Dungy and JB met with officers from CIA’s Talent Center to discuss opportunities and challenges related to diversity and inclusion, as well as how to dispel common misperceptions about CIA to potential candidates. Later that afternoon, JB interviewed Coach Dungy about his philosophy on leadership, teambuilding, dealing with setbacks, and living an “uncommon” life. As they began the discussion, both JB and Coach Dungy acknowledged the work of the CIA officers and highlighted how much they had learned through their time at CIA. “My eyes have been opened today,” Coach Dungy said. “Both James and I have a great deal more sensitivity—and frankly—just a sense of gratitude for what you do for our country.” Coach Dungy discussed the lessons he learned from the most influential people in his life, including his parents, who were educators. “My father taught me that the most important quality in a leader is humility,” Coach Dungy shared. Coach Dungy also reflected on his time with Chuck Noll and the Pittsburgh Steelers—where Dungy played for two years and later served as an assistant coach—and the impact Noll made on his life. When asked what lesson has guided him through his life, Coach ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-08-20
    8 months ago
  • CIA Kicks-off “The Daily Summary: Informing President Truman” A Series of Declassified Releases
    The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) today released the first set of declassified material in a series of six releases of the daily intelligence report President Harry Truman received from the CIA and its predecessor organization, the Central Intelligence Group, between 1946 and 1951. Known then as “The Daily Summary,” the product continues today in the form of the President’s Daily Brief (PDB). Today’s release, available here, includes: The first 20 Daily Summary reports, which highlight the intelligence President Truman received to help address the challenges the U.S. faced in the immediate aftermath of World War II; A 1973 CIA report, “Keeping the President Informed,” about the evolution of the Daily Summary; and A chapter titled, “The First ‘First Customer:’ Harry Truman,” from a forthcoming history of the PDB by CIA Chief Historian David Robarge. The next mid-monthly installment of “The Daily Summary: Informing President Truman” will be available this September with a subsequent release each month through January 2019. The entire collection totals more than 3,000 pages and includes intelligence President Truman received regarding topics spanning the Berlin Airlift, the Chinese Revolution, and the Korean War. For a brief history of the Daily Summary, refer to this story. # # # Posted: Aug 15, 2018 12:19 PM Last Updated: Aug 15, 2018 12:38 PM ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-08-15
    8 months ago
  • Top 10 CIA Myths
    Hollywood has produced some incredibly entertaining portrayals of the lives of CIA officers. The veil of secrecy surrounding the work of real-life intelligence officers lends itself to speculation, and the gaps created are quickly filled in with fiction. These fictional depictions often lead to the solidification of the inaccurate perspectives that most people have of the CIA. In our effort to remain as transparent as possible, we’re debunking 10 of the most common misconceptions people have about the CIA. It may surprise some to discover that we are not the gun-toting, globetrotting, martini-drinking spies frequently portrayed on the silver screen. Myth 1: The CIA spies on US citizens The CIA’s mission is to collect information related to foreign intelligence and foreign counterintelligence. By direction of the president in Executive Order 12333 of 1981, and in accordance with procedures approved by the Attorney General, the CIA is restricted in the collection of intelligence information directed against US citizens. Collection is allowed only for an authorized intelligence purpose; for example, if there is a reason to believe that an individual is involved in espionage or international terrorist activities. The CIA's procedures require senior approval for any such collection that is allowed, and, depending on the collection technique employed, the sanction of the Director of National Intelligence and Attorney General may be required. These restrictions have been in effect since the 1970s. The FBI has the lead on intelligence matters in the United States, especially those directed against US citizens. The CIA ... read more
    Source: CIAPublished on 2018-08-14
    8 months ago