South Carolina Dept of Natural Resources

South Carolina Dept of Natural Resources
South Carolina Dept of Natural Resources
  • Turkey hunters asked to participate in survey
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. April 12, 2019 The SCDNR Big Game Program is interested in better understanding the experiences, techniques and factors of success for Wild Turkey hunters in South Carolina. In order to do that we need the input of dedicated turkey hunters. If you hunt turkeys in South Carolina and would like to help out and participate in periodic online surveys, please fill out the information below to register. This information helps us learn more about hunters' opinions and make more informed management recommendations and decisions. By signing up below, your email address will be included in a list that will receive a survey link that you can access and complete on your computer, tablet or smartphone. The first survey link will be emailed out shortly after the close of turkey season this spring. Other surveys may occur in the future as information is needed. If you signed up and participated last year and your email address has not changed you do not need to sign-up again. You are on the distribution list and will receive a survey link via email. Register for Turkey Survey View the result's from last year's survey ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-04-12
    1 week ago
  • SCDNR asks public not to bother 'lost' deer fawns
    April 9, 2019If a deer fawn is found alone in the woods, leave it there. Its mother has not abandoned it; she is probably nearby. Removing a fawn from the forest is also illegal because the animal is being taken outside the legal season for taking deer, which is the hunting season. Many people who come upon a solitary spotted fawn in the woods or along a roadway mistakenly assume the animal has been deserted by its mother and want to take the apparently helpless creature home to care for it. Young fawns like this have not been abandoned and are still in the care of a doe. The apparently "helpless" deer fawns born during April, May and June in South Carolina will begin daily movements with their mothers in about three or four weeks. Human handling and disturbance of fawns can cause a doe to shy away or even desert her offspring. Also, a bleating response by the fawn can summon nearby predators. It's part of nature's plan for a doe deer to leave her fawn or fawns alone for their first few weeks of life. The reason for this unusual maternal action is that the fawn at this age is better protected away from the doe. The presence of the doe nearby would attract predators because the doe lacks the protective coloration of the fawn, and the older and larger doe has a much stronger odor. A fawn that appears abandoned is merely awaiting a visit from its ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-04-10
    1 week ago
  • Charges issued in Charleston alligator case
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. April 9, 2019 The S.C. Department of Natural Resources' (SCDNR) Law Enforcement Division has issued tickets to the individual responsible for causing a decapitated alligator carcass to show up near a Shem Creek boat landing in Mount Pleasant. The incident received widespread media attention after pictures of the animal were shared on social media. SCDNR investigators were able to determine that the alligator carcass was from an animal that had been legally taken by a professional wildlife control operator under a "nuisance alligator" depredation permit issued to a Homeowner's Association (HOA) in the Mount Pleasant area. Such permits require that the animal's remains be disposed of in a legal manner and specifically exclude disposal by placing in public waterways. The depredation permit disposal regulations were updated and strengthened following a 2015 incident in which five alligator carcasses washed up after being disposed of in the Ashley River. The individual responsible contacted SCDNR voluntarily as a result of seeing the media stories about the carcass, and upon being interviewed by the investigating officer, was forthcoming and cooperative about having disposed of the alligator by putting it in the creek. The individual was written a ticket for littering, as well ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-04-09
    2 weeks ago
  • Digital preliminary flood maps for Tyger Watershed in Spartanburg County ready for public viewing
    April 8, 2019Newly revised preliminary digital flood insurance rate maps for the Tyger Watershed will be available for residents to review at a public open house from 2-8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 at the Spartanburg County Administration Building, 366 N. Church St., Spartanburg. Flood maps show the extent to which areas are at risk for flooding and are used to help determine flood insurance and building requirements. The open house provides residents of the Tyger Watershed (see map) the opportunity to see the preliminary maps, learn about their risk of flooding, and ask questions about what the new maps will mean for their property. Residents can meet one-on-one with a variety of specialists who will be available to talk about flood insurance, engineering, building permits, and more. The complete address for the open house location is: April 10, 2019, 2-8 p.m.Spartanburg County Administration Building366 N. Church StreetSpartanburg, SC 29303 The new preliminary maps were produced through a partnership among Greenville, Spartanburg, and Union Counties; the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources; and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). They are more precise than older maps because better flood hazard and risk data make the maps more accurate. The ultimate goal is protecting property owners and the community from the risks associated with flooding. Over time, flood risks change due to construction and development, environmental changes, floodplain widening or shifting, and other factors. Flood maps are updated periodically to reflect these changes. Home and business owners, renters, realtors, mortgage ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-04-09
    2 weeks ago
  • Archaeological excavation at Botany Bay Plantation Heritage Preserve open to public
    April 8, 2019The public is invited to join the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) Archaeology team as they conduct excavations at Pockoy Island, located on Botany Bay Plantation Heritage Preserve. Archaeological excavation will take place from Monday, May 6, 2019 through Friday, May 24, 2019. The site will be open to the public throughout the season from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday through Saturday each week. The site is closed to the public on Sunday and Tuesday. Guided public tours of the site are offered at 10 a.m., 1 p.m., and 2 p.m. The public can preregister for tours here. The public can also volunteer to help sift for artifacts throughout the field season. Preregistration for volunteers is available at this link. To read an article about the 2018 field season at Pockoy Isand, visit South Carolina Wildlife. Directions to the preserve can be found on the Botany Bay Plantation Heritage Preserve website. Groups of 15 or more who wish to visit the site may contact SCDNR archaeologist Meg Gaillard at (803) 528-1455 or by email at [email protected]. An aerial view of Botany Bay Plantation Heritage Preserve shows tents set up where Pockoy Island Shell Rings are located (Credit Jamie Koelker, Koelker & Associates, LLC.) About Pockoy Island Shell Rings: Pockoy Island Shell Rings (Pockoy 1 and Pockoy 2) are the latest archaeological discovery on Botany Bay Plantation Heritage Preserve, a SCDNR managed area on Edisto Island. The rings were found using Lidar ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-04-09
    2 weeks ago
  • Aquatic Plant Management Council meets April 9 in Chesnee
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. April 2, 2019 The Aquatic Plant Management Council will meet 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 9, at the Spartanburg Water’s Pavilion #1 at 155 Chigger Creek Road in Chesnee. The meeting is open to the public. Anyone with business for the council or needing directions to the meeting place should contact Chris Page at the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) by e-mail at [email protected]. To provide for an efficient meeting and to allow time, please contact Chris Page so that anyone who would like to speak to the Council can be placed on the agenda. The major topic of discussion is the finalization of the 2019 Aquatic Plant Management Plan, based on more detailed analysis by the Council and the public comments received. The comment period closed on March 30, 2019. Items scheduled on the agenda for the meeting of the Aquatic Plant Management Council include: Call to Order 131st Meeting Minutes of the February 27, 2019, Council meeting Public comments Grass Carp Population Monitoring Report – Chad Holbrook Santee Cooper Data Review – Casey Moorer Draft 2018 Aquatic Plant Management plan recommendations and approval of 2018 final plan Review of public comments Modification considerations Approval Drinking ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-04-02
    3 weeks ago
  • SCDNR Wildlife Technician of the Year announced
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. March 27, 2019 SCDNR Chief of Wildlife Billy Dukes presenting Wildlife Technician Eddie Matthews with the 2018 Technician of the Year award in Georgetown. (SCDNR photo by Sam Chappelear) Eddie Matthews, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) wildlife technician from Unit 4A in Region 4, has been chosen as the 2018 Technician of the Year. Eddie demonstrates a great work ethic, brings a wealth of talent, and has continuously contributed to the efforts in Unit 4A and other projects, such as the Heritage Trust Project and the Upper Coastal Waterfowl Project. Eddie’s talents led to the expansion of the Samworth WMA dove field which has resulted in more hunting opportunities for the public, both adults and youth. In addition to his heavy equipment skills, Eddie’s knowledge in carpentry, electrical skills and general problem solving is a huge asset to the agency. Eddie always demonstrates a positive attitude no matter what the task or challenge. His determination and ambition to complete tasks before moving to another reveals his true character and work ethic. He is also a great team player and works well with his coworkers on other projects, and many instances, his coworkers come to him ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-03-28
    3 weeks ago
  • Hampton Wildlife Fund donates $150,000 to SCDNR
    March 22, 2019Hampton Wildlife Fund donates $150,000 to SCDNR The S.C. Natural Resources Board, the policy-making body of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), met Friday, March 22rd, 2019 in Columbia. During the meeting, the Hampton Wildlife Fund presented the agency with a check for $150,000 to be used for state-wide projects during 2019. The total donated to SCDNR by the Hampton Wildlife Fund over the years now stands at $3,802,605. The Harry Hampton Memorial Wildlife Fund, Inc. (Hampton Wildlife Fund, HWF) is a private, nonprofit corporation which partners with SCDNR for the promotion of natural resources and natural resource education, which benefits the conservation of wildlife, marine and other resources in South Carolina. Funds are obtained solely through private donations and special promotional projects and fundraising events. Although some of the funds raised are donated to special projects run by SCDNR, they are not used to replace any of the department’s programs already supported by state appropriated money. “Our primary mission is to raise private funds to support SCDNR in their role as stewards of South Carolina’s vast and precious natural resources and to be a partner in the agency’s educational efforts,” said HWF board chair Deidre Menefee of Wadmalaw Island. “Palmetto State citizens have been very generous in helping us fund SCDNR’s great work here,” said HWF executive director Jim Goller of Beaufort and an SCDNR retiree.” Public education of wildlife and marine resources management and conservation is a major thrust of the fund’s purpose. ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-03-22
    4 weeks ago
  • Help SCDNR find ruffed grouse in South Carolina with smartphone app
    March 18, 2019To get a better understanding of where ruffed grouse are found in South Carolina, SCDNR is asking outdoor enthusiasts to download a free app that will let them document grouse that they see or hear. (Male grouse photo courtesy of Ruffed Grouse Society) Outdoor enthusiasts can download a free app (Survey123) for their smartphone that will help them document sightings of ruffed grouse in the Palmetto State for the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR). Ruffed grouse is a chicken-like bird that is found in the mountains of South Carolina. While they are the most widely distributed upland game bird in North America, their populations have been in slow decline throughout the Appalachian region for the past 45 years. To get a better understanding of where ruffed grouse are still found in South Carolina, SCDNR is asking outdoor enthusiasts to download a free app that will let them document grouse that they see or hear. The app will record the GPS location of where the grouse was seen or heard, and ask the user for information such as date and time, observation type (seen or heard), distance away and number of grouse. SCDNR conducted a ruffed grouse survey in 2018, marking the first extensive survey for the birds in nearly a decade. Preliminary results from the survey confirmed what scientists have long suspected: South Carolina does not have an abundance of ruffed grouse, and detecting grouse is difficult. The survey, which ran from March 15 through ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-03-18
    1 month ago
  • Authorities ask public to help find highly invasive Fig buttercup
    March 15, 2019Fig buttercup, or Ficaria verna. (Photo by Department of Plant Industry, Clemson University) The sound of sniffles and the yellow tint on cars and buildings seen through watery eyes tells us spring is upon us. Trees and plants are blooming, including the Ficaria verna, commonly known as Fig buttercup, which is invasive. Not to be confused with the noninvasive Packera glabella, or Butterweed, there is more to the Fig buttercup than meets the eye. Its bright yellow petals contrast against its dark green leaves and outshines the native plants that once lived on several Carolina riverbanks. Surveys conducted by the Department of Plant Industry (DPI) at Clemson University, a state regulatory agency charged with protecting South Carolina from foreign plant predators, show that colonies of Fig buttercup have established themselves along tributaries of the Reedy River in Greenville and the Catawba River in Rock Hill. "Invasive species (plant or animal) disrupt natural conditions by outcompeting native species creating a cascade of failures from ecosystem processes to loss of indigenous biodiversity. Not to mention that they can wreak havoc on crops and natural areas managed by SCDNR resulting in exorbitant costs to control (total removal is almost never possible) their spread," said South Carolina Department of Natural Resources’ Assistant Botanist Herrick Brown. Native butterweed, or Packera glabella (Photo by Will Stuart/Name That Plant) Compared to some parts of the country, infestations in the Southeast are relatively few and far between, thus many folks have not yet encountered ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-03-15
    1 month ago
  • Become a CoCoRaHS observer today!
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. March 11, 2019 CoCoRaHS is once again conducting its annual March contest to see which state can recruit the most volunteers to measure precipitation. As the saying goes "the rain doesn't fall the same on all." That’s why the SCDNR’s State Climatology Office always has a need for a greater number of volunteer citizen-scientist weather observers. Due to the variability of precipitation, amounts measured can be quite different only a block or two away. Help fill in the gaps by recruiting a friend or relative during our March Madness! CoCoRaHS, the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, is once again conducting its annual March contest to see which state can recruit the most volunteers to measure precipitation. Help us KEEP the trophy in South Carolina! Sign up and join hundreds around the country in gathering weather data used by various local, state and federal agencies! These observations were extremely helpful to the SCDNR Climatology Office and U.S. National Weather Service during Hurricane Florence, Hurricane Matthew and the historic flood of October 2015. The more observations, the clearer the picture, the better the understanding of where it did and did not rain. ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-03-11
    1 month ago
  • Two kayakers located after getting lost in Congaree National Park
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. March 9, 2019 Two kayakers have been found after they got lost Friday evening in the Congaree National Park. At approximately 7:30 p.m. on Friday, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) officers were advised of the lost kayakers. The two male University of South Carolina students put in at South Cedar Creek around noon Friday for a six-hour kayak trip, however, due to flooding, they inadvertently got off the main path and were separated. Officers were able to keep in contact with one kayaker through his cell phone. Around 2:30 a.m. on Saturday, officers located that kayaker in the swamp. He was checked out by EMS and is okay. At approximately 8:30 a.m. Saturday, the second kayaker walked himself out as SCDNR, the Richland County Sheriff's Office, the Richland County Game Wardens, and Sumter County Game Wardens were about to restart the search. SCDNR is thankful for the assistance from county resources, and we're glad everyone is okay and this didn't turn into a tragedy. We want to thank those dedicated officers who worked through the night searching for these kayakers. ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-03-11
    1 month ago
  • Public tip leads to investigation, major EPA violation
    March 5, 2019A man has pleaded guilty to illegally dumping hazardous waste in Richland County after an investigation by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). In June 2017, SCDNR Officer Treye Byars was contacted by a resident of Eastover to report a chemical tanker truck seen several times parked off Highway 601 and Westvaco Road—each time noting an awful smell in the area. On July 7, 2017 just before 6 a.m., an informant called to report the truck was there again. When Byars arrived on scene, the truck was gone, but he noticed a sewage-type smell and called SCDHEC to gather samples from the site. On July 11, 2017, pictures were captured of the truck and driver, 44-year-old Michael Greene, at the site appearing to be dumping. At this time, the EPA was called in to assist with the investigation. It was found the trucking company was contracted to haul 75 tons a day of leachate, or runoff water from the landfill, to Florence at an approved dumping site. This leachate contained 17 different chemicals, such as mercury, lead, lithium and selenium. The EPA was able to determine the site was a navigable waterway, with the site being eight miles from where it enters the Wateree River. Greene faces up to three years in prison. “I’m very proud of Treye Byars and his dedication to seeing this through from beginning ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-03-05
    2 months ago
  • Turkey Tags have been mailed!
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. March 5, 2019 Turkey season opens March 20, 2019 on private lands statewide and April 1, 2019 on WMA lands. If you requested turkey tags when you purchased your Big Game Permit, Sportsman's or Combination License, "Seasonal Wild Turkey Tags" should appear on your annual hunting license and you should have already received your tags by mail. If you don’t have your tags yet, make sure you take the necessary steps to get them soon. All hunters, including youth, are required to have turkey tags in possession while hunting for wild turkey. Youth, Lifetime and Senior/Gratis/Disability Licensees or individuals that did not request turkey tags at the time they purchased their license must request these free tags annually. You can order turkey tags by visiting http://dnr.sc.gov/purchase.html or by completing and mailing in an application or calling (803) 734-3833. Please allow 5-7 days for the tags to arrive by mail. Tags are also available over the counter at SCDNR offices in Charleston, Clemson, Columbia (downtown and Farmer’s Market), Florence and York. Tags are not available at point of sale license vendors (Wal-Mart, Dick’s Sporting Goods, etc.) or SCDNR field offices not listed above. Turkey season opens March 20, ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-03-05
    2 months ago
  • Adult-youth fishing now open at Bonneau Ferry
    March 4, 2019Bonneau Ferry Wildlife Management Area (WMA) located near Cordesville in Berkeley County opened for fishing on March 1. This adult-youth only fishing area provides a great family opportunity to enjoy good fishing in a less crowded natural setting. Adult-youth fishing on Bonneau Ferry WMA is allowed on from Thursday to Sunday during daylight hours starting March 1 until Oct. 31. However, the area is closed on Saturday mornings in April until 11 a.m. due to youth turkey hunts. It is also closed in the fall on any scheduled deer hunt days. “Bonneau Ferry is one of the few areas in South Carolina that is well set up for bank fishing, and we have always focused on adult-youth opportunity out there—whether it be for hunting or fishing. Anything we can do to get families outside and enjoying all that South Carolina has to offer is something that’s going to contribute to more future hunters and anglers here and aid conservation efforts,” said Unit Wildlife Biologist Will Carlisle. In order to fish on the area, a youth (17 years or younger) must be actively fishing and must be accompanied by no more than two adults at least 18 years of age, and adults may only fish if they are accompanied by a youth. Boats are allowed; however, they may only be operated under the power of an electric motor or by paddling. Alcoholic beverages are prohibited. Areas to fish include Quarterman Lake, the largest reservoir on the property at nearly ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-03-04
    2 months ago
  • State Youth Coon Hunting Championship Celebrates 25th Anniversary
    February 27, 2019Jace Shuler won first place in the 25th annual State Youth Coon Hunting Championship, held March 2, 2019 in Hampton County. [SCDNR photo by J. Butfiloski] When all the points were tallied and the last dog rounded up at the end of the night following the annual South Carolina Youth Coon Hunting Championship at the S.C. Department of Natural Resources’ James W. Webb Wildlife Center in Hampton County, Jace Shuler of Orangeburg (Senior Division) and Sly Stone of Johnsonville (Junior Division) took home the first place trophies. George Agner of Edgefield took home the Senior Division Sportsmanship Award, and the Junior Sportsmanship trophy was awarded to Caleb Smith of Branchville The annual State Championship hunt, organized by the South Carolina Coon Hunters Association and hosted by the SCDNR, is the culmination of a series of regional competitions held throughout the fall and winter and sponsored by coon hunting clubs across the state. This year’s hunt also marked the 25th anniversary of this annual event where hound hunting enthusiasts and their families come together at the Webb Center to celebrate the values of fellowship, good sportsmanship and continue the storied heritage and tradition of chasing raccoons through bottomland river swamps. Prior to the hunt, SCCHA President David McKee of Whitmire, S.C., was honored for his 25 years at the helm of the organization that works to keep this traditional sport alive and thriving. Holding a state championship hunt at the Webb Center was the brainchild of McKee and ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-03-02
    2 months ago
  • Draft 2019 Aquatic Plant Management Plan available for public review
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. February 28, 2019 The public is invited to review and provide comments on the Draft 2019 South Carolina Aquatic Plant Management Plan through the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR). Comments and suggestions should be submitted in writing or email and must be received by March 30, 2019. The plan is available for review online at http://www.dnr.sc.gov/invasiveweeds/draftplan.html. The SCDNR, in conjunction with the S.C. Aquatic Plant Management Council, is responsible for the management of nuisance aquatic plants in the state's public waters. Each year SCDNR staff and the Council prepare an Aquatic Plant Management Plan that identifies aquatic weed problem areas, prescribes management strategies, and determines funding requirements. Since the inception of the program in 1981, over 190,000 acres of invasive aquatic vegetation in public waters have been controlled to improve wildlife and fisheries habitat, public recreational access, drinking water supplies, and other uses. All comments should be received in writing or by email by the closing date to ensure that they are given proper consideration in the final plan. No telephone messages will be considered. Anyone interested in providing input should contact Chris Page at the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, 2730 Fish Hatchery Road, West Columbia, ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-28
    2 months ago
  • Flooding may affect public access during special hog hunting seasons
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. February 27, 2019 Marsh WMA experiencing moderate flooding (SCDNR photo) Due to the above average rainfall, as well as spillage from dams upstream, several Wildlife Management Areas (WMA) are experiencing moderate flooding. This may limit or restrict vehicular access to the properties, including the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources’ (SCDNR) coastal properties that offer special hog hunts during the month of March. Woodbury and Marsh WMAs, as well as the Great Pee Dee Heritage Preserve, have been affected. Hunters and visitors are urged to exercise extreme caution before entering these properties and asked to not drive on roads with standing water. SCDNR suggests you check river stages on areas you may hunt and check our website for Property Closures and Advisories before you make the trip. ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-27
    2 months ago
  • Many animal species benefit from snags, so when safe to do so, leave some standing dead trees
    February 21, 2019By Johnny Stowe, SCDNR Heritage Preserve ManagerSnags provide secure homes for many kinds of animals and a virtual smorgasbord of insect food. Downy, hairy, red-bellied, pileated and red-headed woodpeckers all feed heavily on wood-boring larvae of beetles and other insects and invertebrates found in snags. (SCDNR photo by Phillip Jones) Standing dead trees, or snags, may appear to be useless, even eyesores, but they are valuable components of wildlife habitat and are frequently in short supply. They can even be the key limiting factor in a wildlife population. Snags provide secure homes for many kinds of animals and a virtual smorgasbord of insect food. Downy, hairy, red-bellied, pileated and red-headed woodpeckers all feed heavily on wood-boring larvae of beetles and other insects and invertebrates found in snags. And cavities in snags are the original, natural wood duck nesting “box.” As important as man-made wood duck boxes are, it is not practical to place them in all the swamps and waterways that are potential nesting habitat, but snags are found wherever trees grow. Woodpeckers are the primary excavators of nesting cavities in snags. These cavities are later used by other species. Bluebirds, wood ducks, titmice, great-crested flycatchers, chickadees, nuthatches, barred owls, screech owls and kestrels all depend on cavities for successful nesting. Often a cavity undergoes a sort of evolution, with successively bigger birds and other animals using them as rot and woodpeckers enlarge them. In North America, snags provide habitat for at least 85 bird species that ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-22
    2 months ago
  • Prescribed burning planned for Chesterfield County Wildlife Management Areas
    February 21, 2019The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) plans to conduct prescribed burning operations on McBee, Campbell’s Crossroads and Angelus Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) in Chesterfield County in the coming weeks. Prescribed burning, also called controlled burning, is the intentional application of fire to forest, brush or grassland vegetation under specified environmental conditions and precautions that allow accomplishment of planned land management objectives. These objectives are to control competing woody vegetation (shrubs and hardwood regeneration) and reduce flammable fuels, such as leaves, pine needles, limbs, etc. that accumulate on the ground and contribute to wildfire hazards. The decrease in woody vegetation allows native species of grasses and forbs (weeds) to thrive, often resprouting in just a matter of days after a prescribed fire. Not only is the lush new growth excellent forage for many species of wildlife, this herbaceous layer is also very diverse and serves host to different varieties of insects, another primary food source of many wildlife species. Only portions of any WMA will be burned, thereby providing wildlife with a patchwork of burned versus unburned habitat conditions. The relatively small (average size of 25 acres) burns will be administered by professional fire managers in strict accordance with state outdoor burning laws and smoke management guidelines. SCDNR fire management personnel closely monitor weather and fuel conditions to maximize results and minimize smoke impacts on adjacent communities. Burns will only be conducted during the daytime hours. Some roads may be impacted for short periods and appropriate signage ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-21
    2 months ago
  • SCDNR divers assist in river recovery
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. February 20, 2019 The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) assisted the North Augusta Department of Public Safety in the recovery of a man’s body from the Savannah River on Friday, Feb. 15. Three divers from SCDNR’s dive team recovered the body from a submerged car at Hammond’s Ferry Boat Ramp in North Augusta, South Carolina. The next day, divers were able to float the vehicle and take it to the landing. SCDNR was the only dive team on scene. It was determined by the Aiken County Coroner’s Office that the car had been submerged with the man's body inside since the beginning of December. However, the vehicle wasn’t visible until recently because of river flooding over the past few months. Member’s of the SCDNR’s “A.I.R” (Aquatic Investigations and Recovery) dive team are sworn officers specially trained in the use of diving gear. Team members participate in underwater searches for drowning victims and assist SLED and other law enforcement agencies with evidence recovery in criminal investigations, in addition to their regular duties as state conservation officers. SCDNR Director Alvin Taylor, himself a former member, understands the dedication required to serve on the dive team. And, like so ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-20
    2 months ago
  • S.C. Aquatic Plant Management Council will meet February 27, 2019 at Greenwood State Park
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. February 19, 2019 The next meeting of the state Aquatic Plant Management Council will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, February 27, 2019 at Greenwood State Park. The address is 302 State Park Road, Ninety Six, S.C. 29666. The meeting is open to the public. Anyone with business for the council or needing directions to the meeting place should contact Chris Page at the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) by email at [email protected]. To provide for an efficient meeting and to allow time, please contact Page in advance so that anyone who would like to speak to the council can be placed on the agenda. The major topic of discussion for this meeting will be the release of the Draft 2019 Aquatic Plant Management Plan for public review. Items scheduled on the agenda for the meeting of the Aquatic Plant Management Council include: Call to Order 130th Meeting Minutes of the December 5, 2018 Council Meeting Public Comments Draft 2019 Aquatic Plant Management Plan recommendations to be released for public comment Other New Items for Council Action April Council Meeting Date Adjourn ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-19
    2 months ago
  • SCDNR acquires 1,757 acres in northern Greenville County for hunting, fishing
    February 15, 2019SCDNR managers anticipate that the lake at Tall Pines WMA, a newly dedicated property in northern Greenville County, will prove to be a popular destination for anglers and paddlers. [SCDNR photo by Greg Lucas] In partnership with The Conservation Fund, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) recently acquired 1,757 acres near Cleveland in northern Greenville County. The land, referred to as “Tall Pines,” includes about a mile of South Saluda River frontage and will be used to enhance fish and wildlife habitat and provide recreational opportunities to the public, including fishing, hunting and hiking. "We are happy to help provide the hunters and anglers of South Carolina with access to this beautiful area and riverfront acreage,” said Alvin Taylor, SCDNR director. “SCDNR is all about providing more access to the people of South Carolina, while also protecting its important natural resources." The land is on the north and south sides of Moody Bridge Road, in Cleveland, about eight miles north of Travelers Rest. It contains upland and wetland areas, two lakes, numerous streams and a mile of frontage on the South Saluda River. Tall Pines Wildlife Management Area (WMA) provides habitat for fish, deer, turkey, quail and small game. SCDNR partnered with The Conservation Fund, a national non-profit conservation organization based in Arlington, Va., to protect the site. The land is in SCDNR’s Wildlife Management Area program, which provides more than 1.1 million acres of public hunting lands statewide. The purchase price for the Tall ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-15
    2 months ago
  • S.C. Baltimore Oriole Winter Survey and Great Backyard Bird Count set Feb. 15-18
    February 7, 2019A Baltimore oriole (adult male) visits a feeder on James Island in Charleston County. (Photo by Barbara Spence) The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) will conduct an annual Baltimore Oriole Winter Survey Feb. 15-18 in conjunction with the Great Backyard Bird Count. The state natural resources agency is interested in the status and distribution of these colorful songbirds that have begun wintering in the Palmetto State. Survey participants count and record the largest number of Baltimore Orioles they can see at one time, on one, two, three or all four days of the survey period. Even if you are not able to participate during the count period, we would still like to collect your numbers. You can participate in the survey by either requesting an SCDNR survey form, or if you are a Great Backyard Bird Count participant, you can e-mail a copy of your checklist submission to SCDNR. For more information and to receive survey materials, contact Lex Glover at [email protected] For more information on the Great Backyard Bird Count, visit http://gbbc.birdcount.org/. Baltimore Orioles usually winter in South and Central America, and historically it was unusual to see one in South Carolina during the winter. However, during the last few decades, they have been wintering along the East Coast and Southeast in greater abundance. Last year’s Great Backyard Bird Count results had sightings ranging along the east coast from Massachusetts to Florida, with the bulk of the birds wintering from Virginia, south to Florida, ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-08
    2 months ago
  • Learn about improving habitat for quail at SCDNR seminar
    February 7, 2019Improving habitat for the Prince of Gamebirds will be the topic of the annual Quail Management Seminar March 7-8 at the James W. Webb Wildlife Center and Management Area in Hampton County. (SCDNR photo by Michael Small) The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) is hosting its 31st Annual Wild Quail Management Seminar March 7-8 at the James W. Webb Wildlife Center and Management Area (1282 Webb Ave., Garnett, SC). This will be the only seminar about wild quail offered in 2019 by SCDNR. The registration fee is $85 per person which includes meals, overnight accommodations and seminar materials. The deadline to register is Friday, Feb. 22. For more information, contact the SCDNR Small Game Program in Columbia at (803) 734-3609, e-mail Patty Castine or visit http://www.dnr.sc.gov/education/quail.html. Field demonstrations and classroom instruction will focus on habitat practices including firebreak establishment, prescribed burning, forest management, brush control, discing for natural foods and supplemental food patch plantings. Presentations will be given on wild quail natural history, biology, diseases and parasites, predation and other factors that may be contributing to the population decline. An update on current research will also be presented. Speakers will include wildlife and forestry professionals from state and federal agencies. Bobwhite quail populations in the Southeast, including South Carolina, have been declining steadily over the past 60 years due to major land use change and reduction in suitable habitat. The 31st Annual Wild Quail Management Seminar is designed to instruct landowners and land managers in ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-07
    2 months ago
  • Thousands of trout stocked into lower Saluda River
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. February 7, 2019 The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) is stocking thousands of catchable-sized rainbow trout (8 to 11 inches) and smaller brown trout (4 to 6 inches) from the Walhalla State Fish Hatchery in Oconee County into the lower Saluda River near Columbia. This process is done by trucking the trout to four locations in the upper two thirds of the river. The cold waters released from the bottom of Lake Murray provide suitable habitat for the trout, creating a unique and very popular fishery in the Midlands. SCDNR stocks nearly 30,000 trout each year in the lower Saluda from December through February in what’s called a "put, grow and take" fishery that relies on stocking to maintain populations. Trout grow rapidly after stocking and can exceed 20 inches in one to two years after stocking, which is considered trophy size for this type of fishery. Be advised, as of July 1, 2018, ”the lower reach of the Saluda River, from the eastbound I-20 bridge downstream to Stacey's Ledge, is year-round catch and release fishing only for all species of coldwater trout.” It will be “unlawful to take and retain trout at any time” in ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-07
    2 months ago
  • Antler measuring sessions set across the state
    February 7, 2019Antlers will abound throughout the Palmetto State as the search for new state record deer antlers gets underway during the S.C. Department of Natural Resources' annual series of measuring sessions. Each winter, the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) measures deer antlers throughout the state, with a major effort during the Palmetto Sportsmen's Classic on March 22-24 at the State Fairgrounds in Columbia. A total of 7,229 sets of white-tailed deer antlers, including 6,936 typical racks and 293 nontypical, are currently ranked on South Carolina's all-time antler records list. Minimum scores for state record listing are 125 points for typical antlers and 145 points for nontypical antlers. Measurements are based on the Boone and Crockett system. The measuring system is based primarily on antler size and symmetry and includes measurements of the main beams, greatest inside spread of the beams, circumference measurements at certain designated locations and the number and length of the points. To be counted as a point, a projection must be at least one inch long and it must be longer than it is wide at its base. More information on measuring antlers can be found on our website. The objectives of the state records list are to recognize outstanding animals and to identify areas that produce quality deer. This information allows biologists to take a closer look at habitat and deer herd conditions in order to make future management recommendations. Although record deer have been recorded from all counties, Aiken, Anderson and Orangeburg counties ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-02-07
    2 months ago
  • Deer euthanized after several confrontations with public
    January 28, 2019On Jan. 19, 2019 at approximately 9 a.m., an SCDNR officer in Aiken County was contacted by S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control regarding an aggressive “spike” buck deer it wanted to examine for public health purposes after reports of several incidents involving the public. The first incident reported to SCDNR officers occurred on Jan. 16 after a "spike," or with two points, deer attacked someone in a subdivision on the east side of Aiken. The next day, a complainant reported an aggressive deer on Pony Trail. At approximately 10 a.m. on Jan. 19, officers were dispatched to Anderson Pond Road where a deer was actively attacking someone. When officers arrived on scene, they found the victim had light abrasions on her face and bruises on her arms. The victim described the deer as a male “spike,” with a ring of disturbed fur as if it had been wearing a collar for some time. SCDNR and officers with Aiken City Department of Public Safety made contact with the deer approximately 150 yards from where it made contact with the victim. The deer approached the officers and was taken with one shot by Aiken DPS without incident. The deer appeared to be well fed, with no external signs of injury and no obvious illnesses. SCDNR deer biologist Charles Ruth said based on its behavior, the one-year-old deer was obviously hand-raised as a fawn, which is likely why the animal was so comfortable coming close to humans. “Since it ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-01-28
    3 months ago
  • 2018 South Carolina Environmental Awareness Award call for nominations
    The State of South Carolina is seeking nominations for an award to recognize individuals who are doing extraordinary work for the natural environment. Nominations will be accepted through Feb. 28, 2019. The S.C. Environmental Awareness, now in its 26th year, was established by S.C. General Assembly during the 1992 legislative session to recognize outstanding contributions made toward the protection, conservation, and improvement of South Carolina’s natural resources. Each year the public is invited to submit nominations that are then reviewed by an awards committee. In judging nominees, the committee considers excellence in innovation, leadership, and accomplishments that influence positive changes affecting the natural environment. Members of the awards committee represent the S.C. Forestry Commission, S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, S.C. Department of Natural Resources and the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium. The instructions and application form needed to nominate someone for the award can be found on the S.C. Seagrant Consortium website. The 2016 Environmental Awareness Award winner, Sean Poppy, was honored for his passionate work in environmental education and natural history interpretation for more than 18 years in South Carolina. Mr. Poppy serves as the Outreach Educator for the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. 2018 Nominations now being accepted The 2018 Application for nominations can be found on the S.C. Seagrant Consortium website.The deadline for nominations is Feb. 28, 2019. Previous winners of the Environmental Awareness Award include: 2016 – Sean Poppy, Outreach Educator, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2015 – Mark Madden, Environmental Educator, Charleston County PRC ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-01-28
    3 months ago
  • SCDNR responds to overturned boat in Georgetown County
    If you are seeing this, then your internet browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer and you are running in Compatibility mode. You will not be able to view the application with this browser and these settings. Please remove "SC.GOV" from your compatibility view listings using your settings in the Internet Explorer options. January 22, 2019 At approximately 7 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 21, 2019, officers with the South Carolina Department of Natural resources responded to an overturned boat call in Georgetown County. A duck hunter had flipped his boat in the area of Butler Creek off of Pee Dee River. Officers were able to determine the Murrells Inlet man was heading back to the land at low tide when he hit an object and was ejected into the water. He was not wearing his kill switch and the boat with his dog continued forward before going into marsh grass. The hunter managed to get back to his boat, but it filled with water while he was reaching over the side for the kill switch, leaving the hunter and his dog in the water. A friend was able to successfully retrieve the hunter and his dog and bring them back to land. He was checked by EMS and refused to go to the hospital. An investigation is ongoing. Georgetown County Sheriff's Office, U.S. Coast Guard and Midway Fire Rescue also responded. ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-01-22
    3 months ago
  • Above Average Rainfall Breaks Annual State Record
    January 16, 2019The rain gauge located at Walhalla State Fish Hatchery in Jocassee that observed the wettest year in the area. If it seemed like you were pulling out the raincoat and umbrella way too often during the 2018 Holiday season, you were correct. Preliminary data for South Carolina indicates December was the second wettest out of the 124-year record, with a statewide average rainfall of 7.67 inches which is almost double the normal rainfall of 3.56 inches for December. According to Melissa Griffin, South Carolina’s Assistant State Climatologist for Service, the rainfall during December was so extreme it pushed the annual rainfall total at Jocassee to a level never recorded in South Carolina. The Jocassee 8 WNW National Weather Service Cooperative Weather Station located at the Walhalla Fish Hatchery received a soaking 17.25 inches of rain in December 2018, pushing their annual total to a record-breaking 123.45 inches. This value would surpass the previous record of 119.16 inches set at Hogback Mountain in 1979. While it could be several months before this value is official, the S.C. State Climatology Office says there is supporting evidence that 123.45 inches will be the new South Carolina annual rainfall record. S.C. State Climatologist Hope Mizzell, explained, “A nearby USGS automated rain gauge at Slicking Mountain near Rocky Bottom logged a total of 118.2 inches and a NWS Cooperative Weather station at Caesars Head recorded 115.10 inches. These values are relatively close in proximity and in value which supports that the 123.45 ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-01-16
    3 months ago
  • Special Olympics holds special place in SCDNR officer's heart
    January 22, 20191st Sgt. Earl Pope at the Special Olympics with his wife and son, Cooper. This past Wednesday, officers from different law enforcement agencies around the state gathered at the State House for a photo op, which kicked off the 2019 S.C. Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics--an event that happens nationwide to raise money and awareness for Special Olympics. Representing the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources in the run are Cpt. Karen Swink, Sgt. Raquel Salter and 1st Sgt. Earl Pope. Swink said, for her, this is another way to spread positivity. "Being involved with Special Olympics is just one small way I choose to give back to the community. It allows law enforcement to be seen through different eyes and provides an avenue to connect with those we serve—all for a great cause," said Swink. As for Pope, the support shown for the Special Olympics community doesn't stop at the finish line, it follows him home. His son, 9-year-old Cooper, was diagnosed with general idiopathic epilepsy at only 4-years-old. Like many families with children with special needs, there was no book on what to do. The family went to many different hospitals before finally finding the right medication, allowing Cooper to be seizure-free for four and a half years - a blessing for the Pope family. "To watch your kid have a seizure is just something you can’t explain," Pope said with tears in his eyes. "As soon as we got him to Emory ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2019-01-16
    3 months ago
  • Additional federal funding awarded for Crab Bank restoration project
    Additional federal funding awarded for Crab Bank restoration project December 27, 2018 Click on the logo to learn more about the S.C. Coastal Bird Conservation Program and its plans to restore, protect and enhance coastal bird habitat in South Carolina. Early in 2018, the federal government announced a program under the U.S. Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) that would fund ten projects supporting beneficial uses of dredged material. The S.C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) submitted a proposal for this pilot program to cover 100% of the construction costs of restoring the Crab Bank Seabird Sanctuary with beneficial dredged material from the Post-45 Charleston Harbor Deepening Project and was notified just prior to the Christmas break that the agency’s proposal has been chosen as one of ten successful pilot projects under the program. “The federal funds from this award will allow SCDNR to work with Audubon South Carolina, the Coastal Conservation League, and Coastal Expeditions to focus on what we thought was out of reach – working on natural stabilization measures, such as living shorelines, that will increase the lifespan of the island, as well as increase diversity of habitat for shorebirds,” said Felicia Sanders, seabird and shorebird biologist for SCDNR. The award of the WRDA funds means that 100% of the construction costs for Crab Bank could be covered by the federal government. However, many unknowns remain as to when those funds will be made available to the Charleston District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-12-27
    4 months ago
  • What to do with your live tree after the holidays
    What to do with your live tree after the holidays December 27, 2018 Discarded Christmas trees are used as fish attractors at South Carolina reservoirs. Christmas is over, and odds are that you’ll spend the rest of this week undecorating your home - removing the tinsel, putting the ornaments in storage and removing the wreaths from the doors and windows. As for the Christmas tree you hand-picked this year, whether it be a Virginia Pine or a Leyland cypress, there is a way to repurpose it instead of letting it take up space at a landfill. Discarded trees can be put to good use for fish or wildlife, like for erosion control or as brush piles to provide resting and cover for small animals. In addition to benefiting small game such as quail and rabbits, brush piles constructed of Christmas trees can help birds such as sparrows, towhees and wrens. Fisheries biologists with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) use discarded Christmas trees to maintain fish attractor sites and act as natural reefs for freshwater fish. These sites are located at all major reservoirs in South Carolina, such as Lake Moultrie and Lake Marion. Once the tree is sunk, aquatic insects will live and grow within the branches and needles. These insects act as an attractant to small fish which are fed upon by larger fish. Please do not toss discarded trees at marked state fish attraction areas. While repurposing trees are great for the environment, it’s ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-12-27
    4 months ago
  • Tennessee is added to the list of states with carcass import restrictions for South Carolina hunters
    Tennessee is added to the list of states with carcass import restrictions for South Carolina hunters December 20, 2018 U.S. states where CWD has been confirmed are shown above in red. South Carolinians planning out-of-state trips to hunt big game this winter should be aware of restrictions on importing deer and elk parts into the Palmetto State. With big game seasons open in many other states, the S. C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) would like to remind hunters traveling out-of-state not to import into South Carolina certain carcass parts from deer and elk harvested in areas where confirmed cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) have occurred. U.S. States where CWD has been diagnosed include: Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming. CWD has also been found in the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. CWD belongs to the family of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and is similar to mad cow disease. CWD attacks the central nervous system of deer or elk and presents symptoms that include extreme weight loss, excessive salivation, odd behavior and poor coordination. The disease is infectious, communicable and always fatal. A large stumbling block for wildlife professionals attempting to understand how the disease is transmitted is that CWD has a prolonged incubation period of up to two years, and no approved test exists to detect the disease in live animals; diagnosis ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-12-20
    4 months ago
  • South Carolina Ducks Unlimited contributes $25,000 to Crab Bank conservation initiative
    South Carolina Ducks Unlimited contributes $25,000 to Crab Bank conservation initiative December 21, 2018 The South Carolina chapter of Ducks Unlimited presents the S.C. Coastal Bird Conservation Program with a $25,000 donation on Thursday, December 20. Pictured (from left to right) are SCDU Committee Member Jerry Watson, Director of the SCDNR Office of Environmental Programs Lorianne Riggin, SCDNR Board member Dr. Mark Hartley, SCDU State Public Policy Chairman Kip Dillihay, SCDNR Deputy Director for Wildlife & Freshwater Fisheries Emily Cope, SCDU Director of Conservation Programs James Rader, SCDNR Director Alvin Taylor, SCDU incoming State Chairman Brian Ford, SCDU State Publicity & Communications Chairwoman Sarah Nell Blackwell and Audubon South Carolina Executive Director Sharon Richardson. [SCDNR photo by Kaley Lawrimore] Leaders from the South Carolina Chapter of Ducks Unlimited (SCDU) today presented a $25,000 check to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) from the SCDU Tag Fund to support the work of the S.C. Coastal Bird Conservation Program. “Ducks Unlimited (DU) is a long-standing partner with SCDNR and other members of the S.C. Coastal Bird Program,” said DU Director of Conservation Programs James Rader. “We make this donation in support of our continual efforts in South Carolina to enhance habitats for waterfowl, other wetland dependent species and people.” The SCDU Tag Fund supports SCDNR’s Wood Duck Box Program, which provides 1,200 wooden boxes per year for breeding wood ducks to nest in and raise their young, stabilizing and bolstering their populations for generations. DU has also provided financial ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-12-20
    4 months ago
  • Hartsville man charged after dumping bundles of newspaper over bridge
    Hartsville man charged after dumping bundles of newspaper over bridge December 14, 2018 On Friday, Dec. 7, 2018, SCDNR officers received a tip about large piles of newspapers that were thrown over the 14th Street bridge into Black Creek on Segars-McKinnon Heritage Preserve in Hartsville, South Carolina. Officers responded to the area and documented 35 visible bundles of undelivered newspapers with a delivery date of Nov. 21, 2018. Once determining which newspaper outlet the papers were from, officers interviewed several supervisors about the incident. After reviewing distribution, delivery and route information provided by the newspaper outlet, it was determined a local distributer, Mr. Cedrick Benji Larry Ludd of Hartsville, was responsible. Mr. Ludd was the only distributor who failed to deliver newspapers and newspaper inserts to 12 Hartsville area businesses on the exact day the newspapers were marked for delivery. Mr. Ludd was located and charged with litter in excess of 15 pounds. WMA abuse charges are still pending at this time. This incident remains under investigation. DNR Media Contacts After Hours Radio Room - 803-955-4000 More News ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-12-17
    4 months ago
  • SCDNR program manager awarded for service during Hurricane Florence
    SCDNR program manager awarded for service during Hurricane Florence December 13, 2018 Maria Cox Lamm presented with the South Carolina State Commendation Ribbon. On Dec. 13, 2018, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources’ State Flood Mitigation Program Manager Maria Cox Lamm was recognized by the South Carolina Emergency Management Division. Lamm was presented with the South Carolina State Commendation Ribbon by SCEMD Director Kim Stenson and signed by Major General Van McCarty, South Carolina’s Deputy Adjutant General. The commendation recognized her exceptional service to the citizens of South Carolina and in support of SCEMD during Hurricane Florence and the subsequent flood response. DNR Media Contacts After Hours Radio Room - 803-955-4000 More News ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-12-13
    4 months ago
  • U.S. Forest Service teams up with SCDNR and S.C. Forestry Commission on 10-year conservation partnership
    U.S. Forest Service teams up with SCDNR and S.C. Forestry Commission on 10-year conservation partnership December 12, 2018 Bobwhite quail standing alert (SCDNR photo by Ted Borg) The U.S. Forest Service (USFS), the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) and the South Carolina Forestry Commission (SCFC) have entered into two wide-ranging agreements that will allow the agencies to work together in providing long-term active forest management on federally owned forestlands in the Palmetto State. The agreements, called Good Neighbor Authority and Stewardship Contracting, are products of the U.S. Congress’ 2014 Farm Bill and the Agricultural Act of 2014, respectively, and empower the USFS to contract with state agencies and other non-governmental entities to perform large-scale land management services, such as timber harvesting, wildlife habitat improvement and watershed restoration, among others, on South Carolina’s two national forests. Covering more than 630,000 acres, the Sumter National Forest in the upstate and Francis Marion National Forest in the Lowcountry also constitute the largest single property ownership in SCDNR’s Wildlife Management Area program (WMA). “We are particularly excited about the prospects of using these agreements to move habitat restoration forward in a timely and efficient manner on those Forest Service lands that lie within our S.C. Bobwhite Initiative focal areas,” said SCDNR Director Alvin Taylor. The S.C. Bobwhite Initiative is a statewide effort to restore habitat for bobwhite quail and similar declining song bird species. Originally developed to provide public hunting areas across the state, the WMA program has evolved to a ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-12-13
    4 months ago
  • Some Jocassee roads opening Wednesday, others may open Friday
    Some Jocassee roads opening Wednesday, others may open Friday December 12, 2018 **Update:**As of noon on Friday (12/14/2018), all gates on Jocassee Gorges that were closed due to snow and ice storm damage earlier in the week are now open. Some sections of roads remain impassable due to downed trees, but the majority of the area is accessible. Jocassee Gorges’ Horsepasture Road in northern Pickens County, which leads to the iconic Jumping-Off Rock Overlook, is expected to be re-opened by Friday, Dec. 14. (SCDNR photo by Greg Lucas) Some roads within the Jim Timmerman Natural Resources Area at Jocassee Gorges in northern Pickens County are opening on Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 12, while others are expected to open on Friday, Dec. 14. All Jocassee roads have experienced downed trees, and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) is clearing trees as quickly as it can. Motorists should drive carefully and at a reduced speed. Shooting Tree Ridge and Cane Creek roads will be open Wednesday afternoon; however, Cane Creek Road will be locked near the Cane Creek Bridge. Camp Adger Road will be opened as well, although all downed trees have not been removed. The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) anticipates opening Horsepasture Road to Jumping-Off Rock Overlook by mid-day Friday, Dec. 14. As of Wednesday, all roads at the higher elevations still have 3 to 6 inches of snow accumulated due to the winter storm that hit this past weekend. The Jocassee Gorges is in northern ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-12-12
    4 months ago
  • Hunters rescued from capsized boat over the weekend
    Hunters rescued from capsized boat over the weekend December 10, 2018 Stock photo of SCDNR Law Enforcement boat in harbor. At approximately 11 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, SCDNR responded to a boat-capsize on the Pee Dee River and Jericho Creek in Georgetown County. Three duck hunters were retrieving their decoys in a 14-foot boat when the boat started taking on water without their knowledge. When they proceeded the boat forward, the transom went underwater which caused the boat to sink. The three people were in chest-deep water for roughly 90-minutes. One person was taken to an area hospital and treated for hypothermia and is expected to be okay. The other two were treated at the scene and released. U.S. Coast Guard and Midway Fire Rescue provided mutual aid. This incident is an important reminder for people to use extreme caution when hunting because hypothermia can set in within a few minutes. Wear a life preservers at all times and try to keep a cell phone in waterproof bag in case of an emergency. Have a float plan, and let someone know exactly where you’re hunting and when you plan to be back. DNR Media Contacts After Hours Radio Room - 803-955-4000 More News ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-12-10
    4 months ago
  • Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center Winter 2019 tour schedule
    To check the availability of the tours listed below and reserve a spot, please contact the Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center office by email at [email protected], or by phone at843-546-6814 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Reservations are required for all tours and there is no charge involved. Weekly Educational Field Trips typically run in all weather conditions, but other events may be weather dependent. Educational Field Trips Experience a bus-guided tour with SCDNR staff around the 24,000-acre Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center. Participants are introduced to the history of the islands, view various wildlife habitats and historic sites and hear about the legacy of Tom and Jean Yawkey. The activity level of this trip is easy, but participants do have to maneuver two floating docks as they board a pontoon boat for a short ride across the Intracoastal Waterway. Participants should bring a bagged lunch and drink. Dates Most Wednesdays and Thursdays from January to May Time Tour starts at 10 a.m., arrive by 9:45 a.m. Length Approximately 4 hours Number of Participates Limited to 14 people Birding View birds in various habitats on Cat and South Islands. The locations will be determined based on what birds are in residence but will primarily include brackish marshes, managed wetlands and longleaf pine stands. The activity level of this trip is strenuous with several miles of walking involved. Participants should bring a bag lunch and drink. Dates January 8, 2019February 5, 2019 ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-12-06
    5 months ago
  • South Carolina Aquatic Plant Management Council to meet December 5, 2018 in Moncks Corner
    South Carolina Aquatic Plant Management Council to meet December 5, 2018 in Moncks Corner November 29, 2018 The state's Aquatic Plant Management Council is scheduled to meet 10 a.m. on Wednesday, December 5, 2018, at the Santee Cooper Environmental Resources Building, 1 Riverwood Dr, Moncks Corner, SC 29461. The meeting is open to the public. Anyone with business for the council or needing directions to the meeting place should contact Chris Page at the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR)by email at [email protected]. To provide for an efficient meeting and to allow time, please contact Chris Page so that anyone who would like to speak to the Council can be placed on the agenda. The major agenda item is a recap of control operations and problems in 2018. Items scheduled on the agenda for the meeting of the Aquatic Plant Management Council include: Call to Order of the 129th Meeting Public Comments Minutes of the May 8, 2018 Council Meeting(128th) Recap of 2018 Aquatic Control Operations Santee Cooper SCDNR 2018-19 Triploid Grass Carp Health Preliminary insight for 2019 Aquatic Plant Management Plan Topics for 2019 Council Meetings Review By-Laws Other Business Adjournment DNR Media Contacts After Hours Radio Room - 803-955-4000 More News ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-11-29
    5 months ago
  • Hampton Wildlife Fund receives grant from Dominion Energy
    Hampton Wildlife Fund receives grant from Dominion Energy November 29, 2018 Students aboard the SCDNR's Educational Vessel (E/V) Discovery learn by using field sampling techniques and equipment that echo current research methods. [SCDNR photo] The Harry R.E. Hampton Wildlife Fund has received a $5,000 Environmental Education and Stewardship Grant from Dominion Energy. The grant will support the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) Carolina Coastal Discovery Marine Education program, a day-long, outdoor environmental education program designed to help students actively learn the South Carolina State Science Curriculum Standards, expose them to "STEM" careers and create a new generation of environmental stewards of the Charleston area marine ecosystem. In 2016, 34% of all South Carolina 5th grade students scored "Not Met" on the Palmetto Assessment of State Standards (PASS) test in science, indicating a clear learning gap (S.C. Dept. of Education, 2016) and the need for additional methods of teaching science standards. The Coastal Discovery program's hands-on approach to learning improves students’ understanding and retention of science standards. Students spend their day in an outdoor classroom and aboard the 45’ catamaran Discovery, where an SCDNR educator leads hands-on activities such as dissections or marine life identifications. Students use the tools of marine scientists to reinforce the state science standards and gain an understanding of their real-world applications. The educators also work to help the students understand their role in sustaining this unique marine environment by practicing wise stewardship. More than 250 students from Charleston area schools will participate in ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-11-29
    5 months ago
  • SCDNR K-9 teams deployed numerous times in October
    SCDNR K-9 teams deployed numerous times in October November 28, 2018 K-9 team training in the field. (SCDNR Photo by Taylor Main) The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources’ (SCDNR) K-9 teams were deployed 14 times during the month of October. Lance Cpl. Brian Welch and K-9 Max of Clemson were deployed five times in Region 1 for incidents including baiting on WMA, trespass to hunt, failure to tag deer at point of kill, over the limit of deer, night hunting and small game out of season. The team was requested in the National Forest in Oconee County in reference to a suspect who possibly shot over the limit of deer. K-9 Max tracked the suspect nearly half a mile through thick vegetation, locating the kill site, an additional untagged doe, the stand location and a spent shell casing. Region 2 Pfc. Brian Urquhart and K-9 Lola of Florence were deployed five times. The team assisted Darlington officers with a night hunting case where a suspect ran from officers into the woods. The suspect was taken into custody prior to them arriving, but K-9 Lola worked a large wood lot and found a loaded 12-guage shotgun hidden behind a tree. Region 3 Pfc. Patrick Nettles and K-9 Cash of Bamberg were deployed twice and conducted two public presentations at the Cope Career Center for their Law Enforcement Class Levels 1 and 2. K-9 Cash demonstrated his abilities of an article search and wildlife detection for the students. Region 4 ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-11-29
    5 months ago
  • Try Casting a Line, Not Standing in Line
    Try Casting a Line, Not Standing in Line November 21, 2018 Fishing and kayaking on Santee Lakes (SCDNR photo by Taylor Main) Don’t Let the Deals Reel You In! Are you and your family tired of the large crowds on Black Friday? Try some of these great fishing spots instead. County Lake Bank Access Area Anderson Lake Hartwell Sadlers Creek State Park Berkley Lake Moultrie Fred L. Day Fishing Pier Fairfield Lake Wateree Lake Wateree State Park Greenville Lake Robinson J. Verne Smith Park Greenwood Lake Greenwood Lake Greenwood State Park Lexington Lake Murray North Recreation Area Pier Oconee Lake Keowee South Cove County Park Orangeburg Lake Marion Santee State Park Richland Sesquicentennial Lake Sesquicentennial State Park Bank Spartanburg Lake Edwin Johnson Lake Edwin Johnson Pier York Lake Wylie Ebenezer Park Bank For more info on fishing access areas visit - http://dnr.sc.gov/lakes/access.html Also, make sure to have your license before fishing! DNR Media Contacts After Hours Radio Room - 803-955-4000 More News ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-11-21
    5 months ago
  • Annual SCDNR survey shows slight decline in 2018 wild turkey harvest numbers
    Annual SCDNR survey shows slight decline in 2018 wild turkey harvest numbers November 10, 2018 More than 50,000 hunters took to the South Carolina woods hoping to harvest an Eastern wild turkey during the 2018 season. [SCDNR photo by Jay Cantrell] While remaining the state’s second most popular game animal (behind only white-tailed deer) South Carolina’s spring turkey harvest was down about 6 percent in 2018, when compared with 2017, according to the most recent numbers from the S.C. Department of Natural Resources’ annual mail survey of Palmetto State Turkey hunters. The survey was sent to 30,000 individuals who received a set of 2018 Turkey Transportation Tags which are required in order to hunt turkeys in South Carolina. Based on the survey results, an estimated 16,145 adult gobblers and 1,794 jakes accounted for a total harvest of 17,939 birds in 2018, compared with 19,171 birds estimated taken in 2017. Approximately 50,772 hunters participated in the 2018 spring turkey season in South Carolina, versus 52,429 in 2017. While down, those numbers are still higher than they were in seasons prior to 2016. “Keep in mind that legislative changes that went into effect in 2016 provided an earlier starting date and increased number of days in the turkey season in 34 of 46 South Carolina counties,” said SCDNR Assistant Big Game Program Coordinator Jay Cantrell. “The effect of this season change was a 50 percent increase in opportunity (days) for the majority (74%) of the state, so although the harvest was ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-11-19
    5 months ago
  • SCDNR Director recognized with prestigious award
    SCDNR Director recognized with prestigious award November 16, 2018 Director Alvin Taylor receiving Legacy Award from the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Director Alvin Taylor was recognized for his service to the state by the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA). Director Taylor was awarded the National Association of Conservation Law Enforcement Chiefs Legacy Award on Nov. 14 for his dedication to conservation efforts. Director Colonel Eddie Henderson with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources presented Director Taylor with the award and said Taylor was one of the few that lead the way from colonel to director across the country and has inspired others to do the same. Director Taylor said he was humbled and honored to receive such a prestigious award. DNR Media Contacts After Hours Radio Room - 803-955-4000 More News ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-11-16
    5 months ago
  • Female SCDNR officer entering retirement after decades of service
    Female SCDNR officer entering retirement after decades of service November 14, 2018 Lt. Kim Leverich Law enforcement officers at the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) are working in the field all hours of the day. Some are on boats, others are in swamps, and many are in the rural woods of which South Carolina has no shortage. What once seemed like a job for only men has been transformed over the years by different women, like Lt. Kim Leverich. She joined SCDNR in 1995 after six years of service in the military. “At that time, I think we had eight females with this agency,” said Leverich, education and law enforcement outreach officer. “I was assigned to a unit, it was district eight, it was the old Florence region, but I was the first female that unit had had, and it was just an adventure.” In January 2019, Leverich will be retiring from the SCDNR with 30 years combined service. She said it’s always been exciting being one of the few females working alongside men, but that doesn’t mean she didn’t work just as hard as the men. “On our first duck cases, I can remember [a former officer] would always want me to wear a mask with my toboggin, so they couldn’t tell I was a woman and after we caught them, he would want me to take it off.” Leverich said it never got old when people were surprised to see a female game warden. And ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-11-14
    5 months ago
  • Public bird dog training areas established on SCDNR Wildlife Management Areas
    Public bird dog training areas established on SCDNR Wildlife Management Areas November 9, 2018 Field training young or inexperienced pointers is an integral part of successful quail hunting. SCDNR photo by David Lucas The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) recently announced the opening of three Public Bird Dog Training Areas on designated portions of certain Wildlife Management Areas. On these areas, anyone with a valid hunting license and Wildlife Management Area (WMA) permit can train bird dogs between Sept.15 and March 15 (Sundays excluded). Dog trainers may release and take pen-raised quail or pigeons for training purposes, only within the areas designated by posted signs reading “Bird Dog Training Area.” “The average person that does not own a sizable tract of rural land has little opportunity for training a bird dog,” said Michael Hook, SCDNR Small Game Program leader. “We borrowed this idea from Georgia, where public dog training areas have proven very popular, and we believe our constituents will appreciate the opportunity as well.” The Public Bird Dog Training Areas now open in South Carolina are: The entirety of the Angelus WMA in Chesterfield County A portion of the Cliff Pitts WMA in Laurens County A portion of the Landsford Canal WMA in Chester County Locations and directions to named WMA properties managed by the SCDNR can be found on the agency's public lands web pages. Specific boundaries of the Bird Dog Training Areas are delineated on maps within the kiosks located at the WMA parking ... read more
    Source: South Carolina Dept of Natural ResourcesPublished on 2018-11-09
    5 months ago